Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867

Shine Light On Autism

Each year in April, millions of people around the world participate in Autism Speaks’ global Light It Up Blue campaign during Autism Awareness Month. It is a time to recognize and shine a bright light on those affected by autism, and to promote their contributions to our families, communities and society at large.

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a group of complex disorders of brain development. These developmental disorders are characterized, in varying degrees, by difficulties in social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication and repetitive behaviors. Autism currently affects one in 88 children, and for many it is a lifelong disorder.

 

Beyond awareness, it is important as a society to familiarize ourselves with autism and its symptoms so that children and adults on the autism spectrum can feel understood and accepted in today’s world.

 

For many, autism is an invisible disability; unlike a person who walks with leg braces or crutches, for instance, people with ASD are not easily identified by their appearance or upon a brief first impression. Therefore, it is easy for some to pass negative judgment when they encounter someone who does not seem to respond to a request, has difficulty reading facial expressions and other social cues, or may express intense interest that focus repetitively on a single activity or an unusual object. This, coupled with a heightened sensitivity to light, sound, smell, taste or touch, can make the world a very challenging place at times and may result in distressed or unusual behaviors.

 

At the same time, it is very important to note that people with autism also have strengths and skills that may go unseen as well. These often include strong long-term memories, skills in art, music, math or science, an exact adherence to rules and routines and the inclination to be precise and honest. The emphasis needs to be on the abilities of people with autism, not their disabilities.

 

A vital focus of Light It Up Blue and Autism Awareness Month is placed on highlighting the wonderful success stories of so many people with ASD who have overcome many significant challenges in their lives to become fully integrated and contributing members of their communities.   

 

People with autism want to be accepted and included. They want to be a part of our schools, neighborhoods, recreational activities, workplaces and communities. For those with ASD to truly be included and valued, they need to be accepted; accepted for their strengths as well as their challenges. That may mean being a little more patient if it takes a little longer to do something, or if a person doesn’t answer right away or relies on a device to communicate.

People with autism have a lot to say and a lot to contribute to our community—it may just be in a slightly different way. With one in 88 being diagnosed with autism, it’s not enough to just have one month of awareness. Rather, what is needed is a community of support and acceptance year-round; a community that acknowledges everyone’s differences and challenges, and a community that works together to support everyone, making for a richer and more inclusive environment for us all.

 

Area resident Lisa Goring is Vice President, Family Services, at Autism Speaks, www.autismspeaks.org.

News

Starting July 26, the St. Kilian Roman Catholic Church in Farmingdale will feature a production of the hit musical, The Wizard of Oz. 

 

Based on a classic tale—first penned as a children’s novel by L. Frank Baum in 1900 and later transformed into a major motion picture by Metro-Goldwyn Meyer in 1939— The Wizard of Oz tells the story of a girl named Dorothy Gale, played by Zoe Neyer, and her dog Toto, who after being thrown into a twister end up in the Land of Oz. 

 

Trying to find her way home, Dorothy meets Glinda the Good Witch of the North, played by Angela Roedig, who instructs her to “follow the Yellow Brick Road.”

Farmingdale females were out in force on July 12, to represent their hometown at the 31st annual Long Island Women’s 5 kilometer run sponsored by the Runner’s Edge and the Greater Long Island Running Club. 

 

Bob Cook, who owns the Runner’s Edge shoe and sports apparel store on Main Street, said that attendance at this year’s race was the highest in the race’s history, with more than 500 women competing for the grand prize. 

 

According to Cook, over the years, the race has attracted the likes of world-class runners and Olympians from all over the state, racing for the $500 grand prize.


Sports

Throughout the summer, the Farmingdale Observer will feature the box scores from the Farmingdale Baseball League Inc.’s 9/11 Baseball Tournament. 

July 13

Plainedge 12 - Island Trees 2 (9UB)

 

Ozone Howard Huskies 14 - Wantagh Hawks 1 (9UA)

The Farmingale Devils Travel Baseball teams were in action during The 4th of July weekend and provided fireworks in two different states.

 

The 11U Devils won their third tournament this year. They traveled  to Connecticut for the fourth of July tournament. The Devils lost game one on Saturday 7-5 to the Connecticut Defenders and won game two 17-0,The Devils advanced to the playoff round and would meet the Defenders again .The bats were on fire all day led by Big Joe Mcgrath and Nick Franco.The Devils beat the Defenders 11-5 and advanced to the championship to play the number one seed and undefeated Hit Club. The Devils jumped out to 4-2 to lead .The game was tied at 9-9 going to the 6th inning and the Devils would score 2 runs and hold on to win the tournament. The Devils had 52 hits and scored 44 runs,Big Joe had 4 doubles a triple, Nick Franco had 8 hits. Anthony Quatromani 8hits.Matt DiSanti drove in the last run in the championship game. Tim Dorman 6 hits. Patrick Quinn 5 hits and 6 stolen bases. Nick O'Connor 3 hits and 4 stolen bases. Kyle Gaertner 6 hits and was winner pitcher in championship game. Patrick Sanchez was the winning pitcher in semi-final game.


Calendar

Monty Python - July 23

After Hours Networking - July 24

Music Under The Stars - July 25


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com