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Check It Out

Check It Out!: March 20, 2014

P.T. Walkley: Musical Manna From The Land Of Joel

P.T. Walkley — Shoulders (Bathing Suit Music) _ Hailing from Cold Spring Harbor, P.T. Walkley, (better known as Philip Talman to mom and dad), is best known as filmmaker Ed Burns’s composer of choice for the past decade or so. Along the way, Walkley has also been creating music for the Nickelodeon series Team Umizoomi and opening for the likes of Coldplay and Weezer, stopping long enough to pop out the random solo record. Shoulders is his third full-length studio outing and is a nice blend of genres that finds him leaning heavily on classic rock/pop approaches to his music. When Walkley isn’t trafficking in jangly, Tom Pettyish shuffles (“No Time to Sweat”) or mixing in T. Rex-flavored layered vocals (“Blindsided”) he masterfully weaves in blue-eyed soul (“It’s Alright”) and doles out the kind of twee pop reminiscent of the late Elliott Smith (“Silver Dollar Pancakes.”)

Elsewhere, the native Long Islander is equally masterful with his arrangements, be it the horn charts on the punchy “Sirens” or the female harmonies that are such an integral part of “It’s Alright” that would make you think it was a Joss Stone outtake. It’s all the kind of craftsmanship that makes Shoulders a delectable platter of ear worms that makes you wish that Walkley had enough creative bandwidth to cut back on his other musical endeavors and record more solo material.

P.T. Walkley will be appearing on March 25 @ Joe’s Pub at the Public Theater, 425 Lafayette St., NYC. For more information please call 212-239-6200 or visit www.joespub.com


March 21

NYC

Bettye LaVette @ Zankel Hall, 57th St. and Seventh Ave., 10 p.m.

$50, $43. 212-247-7800 www.carnegiehall.org

When Bettye LaVette took the stage at the 2008 Kennedy Center Award Ceremony to sing a show-stopping rendition of The Who’s “Love Reign O’er Me” in honor of inductees Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey, it was the latest step in an improbable career resurrection. Between 2005’s Joe Henry-produced I’ve Got My Own Hell to Raise and 2007’s subsequent The Scene of the Crime, (featuring back-up band Drive-By Truckers), the veteran soul singer had already laid the groundwork for her climb back into the spotlight. Her latest project, 2012’s Thankful N’ Thoughtful, finds her taking on songs from the canons of Tom Waits, Neil Young, and Bob Dylan. (Also appearing on March 22 @ the YMCA Boulton Center for the Performing Arts, 37 W. Main St. Bay Shore. 631-969-1101 www.boultoncenter.org)


March 22

Patchogue

Fifth Annual Patchogue Folk Festival @ the Patchogue Theatre

for the Performing Arts, 71 E. Main St. 8 p.m.

$68, $48, $38, $28, $18. 631-207-1313 www.patchoguetheatre.com

This year’s edition of the Patchogue Folk Festival finds Suzanne Vega headlining fresh off the release of her eighth studio album Tales From the Realm of the Queen of Pentacles. Also on the bill is Amy Helm, on a break from Ollabelle and East End singer-songwriter stalwart Caroline Doctorow. Get there early for a free 2 p.m. show featuring Cathy Kreger, Jesse Pagano, Colleen Kattau and Some Guys, Robert Bruey, Luis Moreno, The Toby Tobias Ensemble, Johnny Zarrow, Laura Meade, and the Jay Scott Trio.


March 22

Westbury

Doo Wop Spectacular @

NYCB Theatre @ Westbury, 960 Brush Hollow Rd., 7 p.m.

$62.50, $52. 877-598-8497 www.livenation.com

With Lou Christie (“Lightnin’ Strikes”), Jimmy Beaumont & the Skyliners (“Since I Don’t Have You”), Charles Thomas’ Drifters (“There Goes My Baby, “Save the Last Dance For Me”), The Marcells (“Blue Moon”), The Capris (“There’s a Moon Out Tonight”), The Coasters (“Searchin’”“Young Blood”) and The Happenings (“See You in September”).


March 23

Stony Brook

Dance Theatre of Harlem @

Staller Center for the Arts, Nicolls Rd., 8 p.m. $40.

631-632-2787 www.stallercenter.com

The first black classical ballet company, the Dance Theatre of Harlem (DTH) traces its origins back to its founding in 1969 by Arthur Mitchell and Karel Shook. Currently under the artistic leadership of former prima ballerina Virginia Johnson, DTH is one of America’s dance treasures and its current tour, “Far But Close,” features new works as well as Balanchine classics.


March 23

NYC

Richard Shindell @ The City Winery, 155 Varick St.,

8 p.m. $30, $28, $25. 212-608-0555 www.citywinery.com

New Jersey-born, Port Washington-raised Richard Shindell has followed quite the intriguing career path dating back to his time in college Razzy Dazzy Spasm Band with a young John Gorka. Over the years, the critically acclaimed singer-songwriter has created quite a respected solo canon, stopping along to be part of the supergroup folkie trio Cry Cry Cry alongside Dar Williams and Lucy Kaplansky. Now calling Buenos Aires home, Shindell is back in town and will be cherry picking material from throughout his catalog including 2009’s Not Far Now. (Also appearing on March 30 @ the YMCA Boulton Center for the Performing Arts, 37 W. Main St. Bay Shore. 631-969-1101 www.boultoncenter.org)


March 23

NYC

The Klezmatics present Havana Nagila @ Town Hall,

123 W. 43rd St. 5 p.m. $50, $45, $40.

212-307-4100 www.the-townhall-nyc.org

New York City has always had vibrant Latin and Jewish musical heritages and thanks to The Klezmatics, this particular show called Havana Nagila will be the musical equivalent of a Reese’s Peanutbutter Cup. Along with Arturo O’Farrill, Sofia Rei, Lewis Kahn and Reinaldo Dejesus, the Klezmatics will be playing a show that’s part of the Newish Jewish Music Festival.


March 25

Huntington

Robert Cray & The Blind Boys of Alabama @ The Paramount,

370 New York Ave. 8 p.m. $80.25, $63, $56, $45.

631-673-7300 www.theparamountny.com

Robert Cray often gets knocked by purists for not playing with the fire of a Buddy Guy or Albert Collins despite a knack for penning numerous soul-blues gems. But given his sure-handed style of guitar playing, Cray should be commended for being a musician who has refused to become hidebound by the genre he’s used as a springboard throughout his career.

Complementing Cray on this bill are the Blind Boys of Alabama, who have almost 70 years of making music under their collective belts. Their vocal skills and impressive gospel acumen has found them collaborating with a wide range

of artists across the secular spectrum. The BBA’s latest, last year’s I’ll Find a Way, was more of the same with the collaborators this time around including Patty Griffin, Bon Iver and Merrill Garbus of tUnE-yArDs.


March 25

NYC

The Winery Dogs @

B.B. King Blues Club and Grill,

237 West 42nd St.

7:30 p.m. $38 adv. $42 DOS. 212-997-4144 www.bbkingblues.com

This latest supergroup has its roots on Long Island thanks to the involvement of Dream Theater’s Mike Portnoy. Rounding out the group is Billy Sheehan (David Lee Roth, Mr. Big) and Richie Kotzen (Poison, Mr. Big). In coming together, the power trio was inspired by the likes of Cream, Led Zeppelin, Soundgarden and The Black Crowes, all of which comes across on the threesome’s self-titled 2013 debut. (Also appearing on March 26.)


March 28

Bay Shore

Cecile McLorin Salvant Trapper @ the YMCA Boulton Center

for the Performing Arts, 37 W. Main St.

8 p.m. $45, $40. 631-969-1101

www.boultoncenter.org

A winner of the 2010 Thelonious Monk Jazz Vocal Competition, Cecile McLorin Salvant has since been tapped to work with a number of other jazz artists including Jacky Terrason, Archie Shepp and Jonathan Baptiste. Salvant eventually made her American label debut with last year’s WomanChild.