Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
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Letter: Vote For Martins

Thursday, 30 October 2014 09:45

When Jack Martins became mayor of Mineola, he set a standard of accountability. He began a program to turn the village back from increasing high debt which would have crashed the village on the shore of one sided thinking.

Re-evaluation of real estate values created the first footing to reduce debt. Then came incentive offers to developers to restore an outdated downtown. The money received enabled park and field restorations and curb and road repairs that were designed to fix the worst first. As mayor, he brought village, town and county together to fix a decades old flooding problem. (Today, that project is completed and everybody is trying to take credit for it).

 

Letter: The Tree Debate

Thursday, 23 October 2014 10:05

Recently, a friend of mine told me about the trees that are designated for demolition along South Oyster Bay Road. The removal of these 180+ trees, which is currently underway, spans the distance between Syosset and Bethpage. A debate surrounds this issue, with residents on one side and county officials on the other. Those in favor of the demolition state that the trees, which are at least 40 years old, have uprooted sidewalks along South Oyster Bay Road. This poses a serious safety concern for those who walk there. Those opposed have stated that trees lend a charm and beauty to the area; they have also argued that trees help the ecosystem, as well as offer shade from the heat. As anyone who has driven along the roadway knows, rush hour traffic can be hampered by the angle of the sun at that time.

I love trees. When we first moved here, I was delighted that the trees formed a beautiful canopy. When autumn changes the leaves from brilliant green to muted golds and coppers, I pop outside with my camera to capture the beauty. As time has gone by, more trees have disappeared, and no longer line our little section of suburbia. This makes walking in the warm weather uncomfortable, as there is no longer any shade.

 

Editorial: Don’t Get Pink Washed

Thursday, 23 October 2014 10:03

In case you haven’t noticed by the abundance of fundraising walks/runs or pink that’s popping up everywhere, be it in the world of sports (bats, cleats, gloves, etc.) or fashion (tons of ribbons), we’re neck-deep in Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Make no mistake that awareness for this disease is crucial and comes in the form of early detection, genetic susceptibility or making proper lifestyle choices. According to the American Cancer Society, 1 in 8 women in the U.S. will develop breast cancer in their lifetime, it will claim approximately 40,000 American lives this year alone and more than 226,000 cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed this year in U.S. women and nearly 2,200 in U.S. men. It’s easy to get caught up in becoming a slacktivist when you think sporting a pink ribbon for the month is making any kind of inroads against this disease when the reality is that discussing the causes and prevention of breast cancer is a far more productive way of battling breast cancer. For many, it’s far too easy for October to become an annual version of the ice bucket challenge.

—Dave Gil de Rubio

 

The Mayor’s Corner: October 23, 2014

Written by Mayor Thomas Tweedy, Village of Floral Park Thursday, 23 October 2014 10:01

Around The Village

With the school year well underway, the lazy days of summer are now a pleasant memory. But for our department of public works, the summer season was a time of great activity. Besides keeping our families healthy, our streets safe and our village beautiful, our public works department found new, creative and innovative ways to better serve the residents of Floral Park.

Our tree department, building maintenance division, highway department and parks department each have been doing exemplary work.

 

Letter: Common Core Gets A Big Fat ‘F’

Thursday, 16 October 2014 11:55

My husband and I had the pleasure of meeting with New York State Senator Kemp Hannon on Sept. 4 to discuss our significant concerns with the Common Core Curriculum. The senator graciously agreed to meet and spent almost an hour with us, listening to the issues associated with the curriculum.   

By now, I am certain that most readers are familiar with some of the problems inherent with the curriculum. Chief among them are the lack of input from educators, early childhood experts and a completely unproven and untested curriculum, despite dubious claims by the creators that they are internationally benchmarked. The absence of such expertise is readily apparent, given the inappropriate expectations imposed upon our youngest students and the subsequent pressure placed on students and teachers alike to produce high marks on state testing.

 

Letter: Senior Moments

Thursday, 16 October 2014 12:04

I read with interest Fred Steinberg’s piece “Long Island’s Saltwater Fountain of Youth” (The Weekend, Sept. 17-23).

I also experienced, to my delight, a similar “seniors are free” encounter. Fifteen to 20 years ago, when I was 55 or 60 years old, I went to renew my pass to the parks of Nassau County. (I’d previously paid $30 for the pass that was renewable in three years.)

The lady at the window told me it was only $15. I asked how long it would be until I had to renew.

“You are a senior, right?”

I said yes, and she told me I wouldn’t ever have to renew it.  

Thank you. I thoroughly enjoy reading hometown news.

Monica Larsen,

Gilbert, AZ

 

Letter: Seeds Of Suspicion

Thursday, 16 October 2014 11:59

I read the article [Nassau Axing Grand Old Trees, Oct. 1-7] and I think pretty much everyone is missing something here. If you look where the “X”s are, they form a nice line from the Long Island Expressway to the entrance of the warehouse and distribution center over by Grumman. Personally, I think Mangano is just making it easier for the double trailer trucks to barrel up and down South Oyster Bay Road. If he or anyone really cared about us, he might try paving the road which the trucks have torn up.   

Also, how is he paying for this? All of the revenue from the traffic cameras and the speed cameras on the road?  

Bruce Gronich

 

Editorial: Journalism As Dream Job

Monday, 13 October 2014 00:00

When Floral Park grads say that they want to major in English, they are quickly pegged as teachers and dumped into the education bin. If they say, “No, I’m a journalist,” they get “Oh, that’s interesting,” in a tone that evokes patting a child’s head. Or the suggestion, knowingly delivered, that it’s “a dying field.”

Writers have long been envied for their creative freedom and perceived cushy work, even as they are pitied for their wages.

 

Letter: Revisiting Hurricane Sandy and the Fracking Debate

Monday, 13 October 2014 00:00

As the second anniversary of Hurricane Sandy approaches, memories of the destruction produced by the storm still haunts most Long Islanders.

I have lived in Massapequa since 1982. During that time, I have lived through Hurricane Gloria, blizzards, torrential rainstorms and Hurricane Irene. What happened the night of 10-29-12 was traumatic for me, my wife and daughter.

 

Editorial: Scouting For Leaders

Thursday, 02 October 2014 09:20

Nassau County got into Scouting way back in 1917 with the first Boy Scout council and first Girl Scout troop. At the time, the orienteering and outdoor skills Scouting promotes were still useful, even in

Floral Park. Nearly 100 years later, our lives are much less rustic. Now, troops are more likely to promote robotics studies and entrepreneurship than how to start a fire or build a lean-to. But there’s a hitch at present. Scouting relies on local adults—parents, grandparents, uncles, aunts and cousins—for leadership. To empty its waitlist of 800 girls, Girl Scouts of Nassau County is calling for volunteer leaders, especially in Floral Park.

 

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