Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

Changes Upcoming To Village Board

Stewart Manor Mayor And Deputy Leaving

Stewart Manor Mayor James Kelly and Deputy Mayor Robert C. Fabio said they will not seek re-election at upcoming village elections March 19.

Kelly, who also served on the board as a trustee from 2001 to 2007, said that while he was proud of what the board has accomplished during his tenure, “I will not be abler to invest the time and effort required due to personal and professional obligations.”

“While being a member of the board is an honor, and a very rewarding experience, a four-year term is a significant commitment,” Kelly said. Fabio will also not seek re-election, but together with the current board will “work in earnest over the next couple of months to work on a really good budget for the coming year,” he said at the Stewart Manor trustees meeting on Jan. 8.

It appears next year’s village budget will have a solid foundation upon which to build, based on an independent auditors’ report performed by Albrecht, Viggiano, Zureck & Company, P.C. The accounting firm audited the village’s financial statements of the governmental activities, each major fund and the aggregate remaining fund information for the fiscal year ended May 31, 2012, and published its report in November. The report can be found on the village web site: www.stewarwtmanor.org.

Village Fund Balance

“We have a very, very strong fund balance, over $800,000 as of May 31, 2012,” Fabio said. “In meeting with the auditors and going over where our fund balance was only a few years ago … if we encountered a storm like Sandy [back then], we would have barely had enough cash to pay for some of the costs out of pocket,” he said. To date, out-of-pocket costs due to Superstorm Sandy are $71,638, of which the village has received slightly more than $20,000 in insurance claims, Fabio said.

More reimbursement to the village from insurance and FEMA is expected, he said, adding that the village has been in constant contact with state officials to have additional storm-related tree work done to avert more out-of-pocket costs. The village DPW continues to handle a large number of tree damage, but some of the work is beyond the scope of the village’s equipment and manpower, Fabio added.

The village’s available fund balance has increased by more than $600,000 compared with four years ago, according to Kelly, who attributes the surplus to not only reducing many village expenses but also “taking a close look at and making significant changes to how our village operates. The pool and village court are two excellent examples.  “These two critical areas of the village no longer operate at a loss,” he said.

Improving the profitability of the Stewart Manor Pool goes hand-in-hand with fostering a family-friendly environment for members. A big boon in terms of profits was introducing food service via an agreement with the Stewart Manor Country Club. Pool members and guests now have the option of ordering hot and cold meals during limited hours throughout the summer. As for the village justice court, an outside firm was hired to handle collections, which brought down outstanding receivables.   

Rosemarie And Sandy

In addition to cleanup from Superstorm Sandy, some of the fund balance this year was used to complete capital projects throughout the village, such as replacing the decayed retaining wall on the north end of Fernwood Terrace and making necessary repairs and improvements to village hall and the DPW garage, according to Kelly. The beautification of the Covert Avenue LIRR crossing is another project that was started using these funds, he added.

To be sure, residents have not had to bear the burden of that rise in fund balance. “Village taxes have had a net decrease over the past three years, and as we work on preparing next year’s budget, my goal is to have no tax increase again this year,” Kelly said. “Trustee Fabio and Village Administrator [Rosemarie] Biehayn have worked tirelessly on our village finances over the past four years, and their hard work is the main reason our village has accomplished its financial and budgetary goals.”

Fabio echoed Kelly’s nod toward Biehayn’s role in the current state of the village’s financial health. “The village should be very secure in the fact that we have a reasonable balance and are also able to make reasonable purchases and improvements in the village under the watchful eye of Rosemarie and the board,” he said. “The auditors were very pleased with the village’s finances, particularly compared to other villages and towns on Long Island and throughout New York who are borrowing from fund balances or are basically borrowing to pay for operating expenses. And when you see something like Sandy happen and you read in the paper about villages who can’t get their village hall repaired or can’t get things done and they wish they could borrow money, it makes you realize how important it is to make sure that we are fiscally sound,” he said.

“Obtaining grants from various sources has also played a significant role in helping keep village taxes in check,” Kelly added. “These grants have been used to acquire necessary equipment for our fire and public works departments and to make improvements to our pool and village structures. Additionally, we have received final approval for a $50,000 grant towards installing a much needed natural gas generator for our village hall. This project will be going out to bid shortly. We have also received preliminary approval for a $100,000 grant to be used for improving and beautifying Covert Avenue,” he said.

Kelly points out that the village’s fiscal gains have not come at the expense of services. Administrative and DPW staffing have been increased, “allowing us to operate more efficiently and provide better services to our residents. This improvement was seen time and time again in the exceptional response of our village during the two major hurricanes and the many severe winter storms we have endured over the past four years.”

Candidates for the upcoming election must submit their petitions,  along with a minimum of 25 supporting signatures, to the village clerk between Feb. 5 and Feb. 12. Open positions include the mayor, two trustees and the village justice. 

News

Have you considered adding running to your exercise regimen but not sure how to get started? Are you concerned about past injuries? Runners, from experienced to beginner, are sidelined every year due to injury. Physical Therapy Options (PTO) wants to help runners get off to a great start this fall and is pleased to offer the community an opportunity to receive a free comprehensive “Running Analysis.”

 

Physical Therapist Lisa Coors, founder of PTO, views this offering as part of PTO’s mission to help patients live a balanced and healthy lifestyle. 

Yard sale announced

 

The Garden City Bird Sanctuary/Tanners Pond Environmental Center recently announced its annual Fall Benefit Yard Sale. The sale will be held on Saturday, Oct. 4, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., located outdoors inside the front gate at the sanctuary. Vendors are being sought. A 10 x 17 foot selling area is $45 for the day. (Includes space for selling & space to park one car next to selling space)


Sports

Dance Conservatory Program

 

The Garden City Recreation Department’s Dance Conservatory Program is pleased to announce the start of registration for its upcoming 2014-15 season. Director Felicia Lovaglio, along with Mary Searson and the rest of her staff, are excited to start off another fantastic year. The dance conservatory offers classes to Garden City residents ages 3 through adult which are non-performance based. Age is determined by the start date of the desired class. 

 

Note: Registration is by mail only until Sept. 23. Participants MUST be the required age by the start of the program in order to register. 

 

Each session costs $220 for 22 weeks of class. The schedule and fees for this year’s youth classes are as follows (all classes are 55 minutes long unless otherwise noted): 

Fall Children’s Tennis Classes

Registration for the start of the Fall 2014 Indoor Tennis Program for Children has begun at the Community Park Tennis Center. Walkins and non-resident children attending Garden City Public Schools* will be accepted beginning Sept. 11. Please make checks payable to the “Inc. Village of Garden City." Please note—classes are not considered day care and can not be declared for tax exemption.

* Non resident children who would like to register for the tennis program must prove they attend one of the Garden City Public Schools. Proof must accompany registration. An additional $50 fee will pertain to anyone in this category.

10 weeks of classes—classes will begin Thursday, Sept. 18


Calendar

Living With Pulmonary Fibrosis Program - September 18

Harpeth Rising Concert - September 19 

JV Football - September 20


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com