Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Intended comprare kamagra senza ricetta company.

Possible 18 Teachers Coached Students

As many as 18 teachers in the Glen Cove school district may have coached students to help them raise low test scores, district officials revealed last week as an inquiry into alleged improprieties in standardized testing intensifies in one of Long Island’s largest public education systems. 

 

Additionally, district officials said that in March, they were alerted to a separate allegation, against Glen Cove High School, regarding a grade change, in which two administrators may be implicated.

 

The Nassau County District Attorney’s office issued two subpoenas in mid-April seeking information on alleged grade changes by administrators in the 2012 Regents exam as well as on the alleged improper test coaching by teachers at the elementary schools.

 

School district officials, who have been grappling with what might be the district’s largest cheating scandal, said last week that the investigation was launched after some students admitted in interviews that they had been coached by teachers during the administration of the New York State Grade 3, 4 and 5 ELA and math assessments conducted at the Connolly and Landing Elementary schools last year. The teachers were allegedly concerned about low scores. 

 

District officials disclosed the existence of the investigation two weeks ago. None of the teachers were named, nor did district officials say how many students may have been coached. They stressed the investigation is ongoing.

Last week, the school board said in a statement that district officials were “disappointed to hear the initial information this past fall,” and that “the improprieties appear to go beyond one student and one teacher.” The statement said also that it was “particularly problematic, as the allegations suggest, that children were denied educational services that they would have received had their test results been free of teacher assistance.”

 

Last fall, the board hired independent outside counsel to investigate the allegations in order to determine the “legitimacy and scope” of the allegations, based on advice of outside counsel and input from the New York State Education Department. The investigation has been “professionally led by outside legal counsel,” according to the board’s statement.

 

The so-called “trigger” for the investigation was a parent’s comment to a teacher which raised suspicions about the possibility of test coaching at the two elementary schools. The parent reportedly requested services for her sixth-grader, who she said was behind in math. The services were denied based on too high a score on a Regents exam, according to officials. The parent is said to have responded by saying that the only reason her daughter did so well was that her teacher helped her, which immediately raised a red flag and opened the door for questioning. 

 

District spokesman Michael Conte said it is common for the DA’s office to request records and conduct interviews with district officials and attorneys before deciding if the evidence warrants a grand jury.

 

Conte said the investigation is a “process that is codified, and there is “nothing arbitrary” about actions taken.  Penalties range from reprimand to suspension without pay to firing, after impartial hearings mandated by state education law.

 

The board’s statement said, “...if the independent counsel’s report results in the Superintendent of Schools bringing charges against one or more of our employees, the Board of Education will be the arbiter of whether there is probable cause for these charges.”

 

“Make no mistake - these investigations are warranted based on legitimate, detailed concerns expressed by particular parents of young students, as well as other employees of our district,” the statement said. “We simply want the truth to come out through the process.”

News

If Heather Lehrman is not yet a familiar face to local pet owners, her name is likely to soon become a household name to dog lovers and families with young children, as her children’s book, Bullied at the Dog Park, was released this week. The book is based on a real-life incident with her own dog, Herbie, and fans will have a chance to meet her and Herbie at a book signing at Petco in Glen Cove on Saturday, Oct. 25.

 

“I wanted to help get the message out in my own way about the effects of bullying,” says Lehrman, a resident of Great Neck. “This book teaches children valuable lessons about treating all dogs (and people) with respect, and the importance of simple kindness.”

It was Dec. 31, 1999, the last day of the 20th century, and Florence Dolling was preparing an elaborate Thai dinner for a New Year’s Eve celebration in her home in Glen Cove when the phone rang.  It was her doctor reporting that, “Yes, it was breast cancer.” She kept on cooking, attempting to retain as much normalcy as she could muster, knowing that, with the new millennium, there would certainly come change.

 

“I wore a red strapless bustier for the party because I thought I was saying goodbye to the ‘girls’,” she says. “My husband, my sense of humor, and my friends, helped me get through that night,” she recalls.


Sports

On Tuesday, Oct. 7, the Glen Cove Finley Middle School opened their football season with a home game against Thompson Middle School. The game opened with the Glen Cove offense going on a nice drive, which saw quarterback Mike Vaughan score on a 30-yard touchdown run. 

Six North Shore High School athletes competed in the 2014 JCC Maccabi Games and led the New York Delegation to victory, winning gold. The students included Jacob Abramowitz, Brett Bennett, Drew Jacklin, Ben Lerner, Josh Mandell, and Ben Saltzman. The Maccabi Games is a week-long Olympic tournament for Jewish teenage athletes, ages 14-16 years old. It is held in numerous venues across the United States. 

 

Bennett proudly said, “Competing in the Maccabi Games was a unique and thrilling experience for me. It not only was a highly competitive basketball tournament, but it also emphasized the importance of building strong values such as good sportsmanship, leadership, team unity, compassion and respect.

This, for me, was an experience of a lifetime!” 


Calendar

PTA Meeting - October 15

Live Music - October 16

Wine Tasting - October 17


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com