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E-cigarettes Are Not Safe

Just when it appeared that many of our youth were deciding that cigarette smoking was not a good idea, a new form of smoking has now become available - electronic cigarettes, which are now considered “cool” among teens. 

 

SAFE, Inc. is committed to educating Glen Cove youth and their parents regarding this new form of smoking and will continue to partner with the Tobacco Action Coalition of LI to drive home the fact that using e-cigarettes may lead to smoking conventional cigarettes and it is not safe. 

 

“E-cigarettes contain nicotine, which is highly addictive and a gateway to more traditional tobacco products,” said Carol Meschkow, Nassau Coordinator for Tobacco Action Coalition of LI. “Parents and educators do need to be concerned about the tobacco industry’s efforts to groom the next generation of smokers.”

 

Battery-powered e-cigarettes are being openly used by celebrities, a signal to youth that they are cool and a safe alternative to traditional cigarettes which they are not.

 

The Bach-Harrison Prevention Needs Assessment Survey was given by SAFE, Inc. and administered by the Glen Cove School District to students in grades 6, 8, 10, and 12 in January 2012. The results of the survey found that although

tobacco use is higher in the upper grades, it is lower than the national average. But there is still a need for parents to join in stressing how harmful cigarettes are, including e-cigarettes. 

 

“Parents can take a number of effective actions to protect their children from starting to smoke or becoming another one of the tobacco industry’s addicted customers and victims,” said Dr. Sharon Harris, executive director SAFE Inc.

“Studies consistently show that parental actions, attitudes, and opinions about smoking have a great deal of influence on whether or not their children smoke.” 

 

Parents can try the following to impress on their children the need to avoid cigarettes:

 

• Be open with them. When a parent knows their child may be going somewhere where there will be smoking they should talk to them about how to deal with the situation. 

 

• When parents are with children and they see an advertisement or a television show where someone is smoking they should open up a conversation about why it is harmful to smoke.  

 

• Perhaps the hardest part for a parent is if they are smoking themselves or there is a relative who smokes. There’s nothing wrong with saying that they regret starting smoking. Encourage the teen not to start. 

 

Parents should also share the following short-term and long term effects of smoking with teens:

 

Short-term effects of smoking include addiction to nicotine and exposure to other dangerous chemicals; higher likelihood of respiratory problems; shortness of breath; phlegm and a gross-sounding cough; impaired lung growth and function; bad breath, yellow teeth, and stained fingers.

 

Long-term effects and risks of smoking include addiction to nicotine and exposure to other dangerous chemicals; lung, mouth, throat, kidney, and stomach cancers; coronary heart disease; emphysema and other chronic diseases; shorter lifespan (up to 20 years shorter); foul-smelling clothes and hair

 

And tell teens to forget about even trying e-cigarettes. 

 

“The recent rise in our youth’s usage of e-cigarettes is a cause for alarm,” Meschkow said. “Not only is it troubling that the product has not been studied for long-term health effects nor regulated by the FDA, but its presence on TV, etc. is counter productive to the restrictions on tobacco advertising we have seen in these venues since the successful outcome of the Master Settlement. Clearly, e-cigarettes with chemicals like diethylene glycol, an ingredient in antifreeze found in these product’s cartridges, is not something we want our teens inhaling.”

 

SAFE Inc. is committed to eliminating teen drug and alcohol use in Glen Cove. Through a combination of prevention, education, and law enforcement efforts, SAFE Inc. combats the devastating effects that can result from underage drinking and drug use in order to build a safer Glen Cove.

 

For more information regarding SAFE, Inc and the PRIDE Coalition, or to view SAFE Inc.’s Public Service Announcement, visit www.safeglencove.org.  


News

In order to meet the necessary budget requirements, the Glen Cove School District will reduce school staff members, starting in the 2014-15 school year. One administrative staff member and nine instructional staff members will be let go, according to Superintendent

Maria Rianna’s report at the Monday night school board meeting. Staff reductions will also be made to teaching assistants, school monitors, substitute teachers and custodial and maintenance workers. The total savings for the district is $1,227,669.

 

As of March 31, revenues for the district total $79,281,428. The revenues include the tax levy ($64,780,719),  P.I.L.O.T.s ($1,908,060), tax on consumer utility bills ($1,250,000)n use of reserves ($1,250,000), State Aid ($8,751,799), all other revenues ($635,850) and appropriation of unassigned fund balance ($750,000).

 

The total appropriations for the district are $80,509,097 and revenues are $79,281,428 with a budget gap of $1,227,669.

 It has been five years since a particularly heavy rainfall closed all the beaches in Glen Cove including Crescent Beach. As per Nassau County Department of Health standards, beaches are ordered closed after heavy rainfall because of storm water runoff that adversely affects bacteria levels at local beaches. Typically, bacteria levels subside within a day or so, allowing for the beaches to be reopened. This was not the way it went with one popular beach after the June 2009 rain storm.

 

“Unfortunately, this was not the case with Crescent Beach,” said Glen Cove Parks & Recreation Director, Darcy Belyea, at last Wednesday night’s public forum at Glen Cove City Hall. “Elevated levels of microbiological contamination continued to be found in the bathing water months after the heavy rain and recent samples show they are still elevated today.”

 

Belyea was one of a number of panelists at the public forum, which included Glen Cove Mayor Reginald Spinello, City Attorney Charles McQuair, Director of the Hempstead Harbor Protection Committee Eric Swenson and representatives from the Nassau County Department of Health. 


Sports

 

Glen Cove High School players, from left, Tajah Garner, Dejon Taylor, Manny Sican, and Ralik Jackson, after the Long Island Colts u18’s team vs. St. Anthony’s at Robert Finley Middle School last week. Touchdown ‘tries’ by Garner, Taylor and Sican.


The third- and fourth-grade Knights took to the road last weekend as they faced off against Jericho early Sunday morning, April 6.  Jericho’s teamwork and hustle brought down the Knights by a final score of 5 – 0.  The early game may have been a factor as the boys started to play better and more like a team as the game went on.  Once again, goalie Tyler Shea played outstanding in goal and was relieved by Christian Maiorano, who did just as well in the second half.  Andrew Guster played solid defense in the loss.


Calendar

Eggstravaganza - April 16

Live Music - April 16

Community Easter Egg Hunt - April 19


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com