Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

Taking The Reins

Trinity Lutheran welcomes
Lisa Cacchioli as new school’s principal

Spend a few minutes with Principal Lisa Cacchioli and three words come to life. “A Caring Place,” which is etched on the red awning over the Nicholai Street entrance to Trinity Lutheran School, is transformed from a gentle greeting into a warm embrace of every student inside.

Add a dedicated staff and you have a center of learning combining cutting edge technology, educational basics and deep moral values.

“I firmly believe in respect for everyone at all times,” Cacchioli said.

That respect is evident in the comfortable lobby that greets visitors with a wall of wisdom that changes in theme each month.  January – new beginnings.  February – the heart. In an interview before a tour of the school she clearly loves, Cacchioli praised a talented parent for assembling the sayings, scripture and artwork, noting, “It takes a village to raise a child.”

Students at Trinity Lutheran range in age from 2 to 14 – kindergarten to middle school. In addition to Hicksville, they come from Westbury, Plainview, Jericho, Hempstead, Levittown and Syosset. The school was founded in 1952.

After greeting each one at 8:15 a.m., Cacchioli makes the daily announcements on the public address system before she shares a literary treat with kindergartners, first- and second-graders. Each day she reads a page or two of Charlottes Web.

“They love it,” Cacchioli said. “Reading is so important.  It changes lives.”

One innovative class is devoted to study habits. A popular one, it focuses on the importance of organization and note taking. Cursive is also taught as is sentence diagramming and grammar, subjects that sometimes take a backseat in this age of fast communication.  


Computers are also an integral part of the curriculum. She proudly showcased a fully equipped computer room, filled with students glued to their screens working on “endangered animal research,” according to instructor Mr. Stainkamp.

“Kids just love computers,” he said, explaining their project will evolve into a PowerPoint presentation.

Smart boards fill many classrooms, but not all. Cacchioli said a fundraiser is being planned for later this month to bring smart boards to every room. “We need more,” she said, eying eight.

Keeping her students in shape is a high priority for Cacchioli, as is giving back.  Physical education teacher John Asenza described “Hoops for Heart ” that has students engaged in “anything that has to do with jumping” as a way to stay fit and help the community at the same time. The student’s efforts, Cacchioli explained, raise money that is donated to the American Heart Association.

“We have amazing students,” she said with contagious enthusiasm, as she navigated the picture-filled walls upstairs and down. Visiting one classroom, a 2-year-old, Nicholas, spontaneously hugged her.

Later visiting the multipurpose room, Cacchioli offered words of encouragement and caution to a class of preschoolers who turned the large room into a temporary tricycle track zooming round and round on shiny three-wheelers. In another room she was serenaded by Mrs. Evers’ class of 4 year olds, who belted out a patriotic song while one student held the American flag.

With the exception of the young ones in the Early Childhood Center, every student wears a uniform, providing “consistency,” Cacchioli said, along with easing the pressure of the age-old question – what do I wear today?

“Our community,” she said of Hicksville, “has always been solid and hardworking,” two traits she instills in her students. “I am here all the time,” she said, and teachers stay late, providing role models for the children.

Students also stay late to help one another. Their peer tutoring program involves middle school students assisting the younger ones in reading, math and other subjects

Character-building takes countless forms from words of the month – friendship, perseverance and integrity, for example – to the adoption of a charity by each class, to the Wednesday worship service in the chapel led by Pastor Henn or sometimes a parent.

Lighter moments of the week include pizza day every Friday, but this day – a bitter cold Monday – featured the gentle aroma of homemade chicken soup and garlic bread.       

A graduate of C.W. Post, Cacchioli later received her masters in education from Queens College, following a brief time as a bond trader on Wall Street. After having two children – a daughter, 22, and a son, 20 – she knew her love was education and she began teaching, “a calling,” she said. She served as interim principal for a year three years ago after teaching for some 10 years, then returned to the classroom for a year before being named principal.     

“Our teachers are phenomenal,” she said. Many stay decades. The director of the Early Childhood Center, Mrs. Rausch, is stepping down this year after 36 years. “I’ve taught hundreds of kids,” she said as she held a tiny pair of plaid high top sneakers preparing to return them to the rightful owner.  

Clearly comfortable in any classroom or enthusiastically greeting teachers or students in the hallway, Cacchioli said all she has to do is spend time with her students and her day is brighter.  

“I feel like I was led to this,” Cacchioli said.  

News

When life hands you lemons, make lemonade. That’s just what a Hicksville baker is doing, except in her case it isn’t lemons, but a gluten-free diet. Her lemonade stand of choice is her brand new gluten-free eatery, “Jac’s Bakeshop and Bistro,” which held its grand opening on April 12.  

“I’m a baker who can’t even eat wheat or eggs,” said owner Jaclyn Messina, chuckling at the irony.

There’s a lot you can do in 99 minutes. You could cook dinner, play a non-stop soccer game, watch a romantic comedy or hang out with Odysseus, Achilles and Hercules. If you chose the last option, Hicksville High School’s upcoming theatre production of The Iliad, The Odyssey, and All of Greek Mythology in 99 Minutes or Less  is the place for you.

The mouthful of a title says it all. The cast will take on over 80 characters as they speed through all of Greek mythology, including popular tales such as The Iliad and The Odyssey, in a little over an hour and a half.


Sports

Vito Sciascia was recently named Hicksville Soccer Club’s Volunteer of the Year at the 2014 Long Island Junior Soccer League 2014 Kick-off Convention.

Sciascia started coaching travel soccer in 1998 for a boys team, the Flash, who later changed their names to the Muddogs. He could always be found at various sporting fields trying to recruit new soccer players. He would make each of these boys feel important and there was always room for another player. He tried to never turn a child away and when other coaches were having trouble with a boy he would take them on his team, no one was ever too much for him. Sciascia found the good in all those boys and they in return respected him. He took them to many tournaments and solicited enough sponsorship so that it was never a financial burden on their families.

Cantiague Park Senior Men’s Golf League had its first tournament on Thursday April 4. Twenty golfers came out on on a crisp but sunny morning. Charlie Hong was the only man to score under a 40, with a 38 and won for low overall score. Jim O’ Brien  scored a 41, and won low overall net in a tie-breaker with Mike Guerriero.

Competition on the nine-hole course is divided into two divisions. Flight A is for players with a handicap of 13 or lower. Flight B is for players with a handicap of 14 or more. The league is a 100 percent handicap league. Any man 55 years or older is eligible for membership. We have many openings for this year, and you can sign up anytime throughout the the season.


Calendar

The Acchords Concert

April 26

Senior Citizen Luncheon

May 1

Curtains

May 1-3



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com