Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867

Letter: Found Money

Thursday, 25 July 2013 00:00

How often does a municipality get to generate $32.5 million in unanticipated revenue? Not often in today’s tight economic times. Yet that’s exactly what’s happening in the Town of Oyster Bay. Town officials have put together a deal with a responsible development firm whereby the town would sell surplus public works property in Syosset for $32.5 million. In return, the firm pledges to support smart alternative development while ensuring community input and embracing environmentally friendly planning.

It all sounds good, yet a greedy developer who has been trying to build a mega-mall in the area for 17 years is trying to generate phony opposition to the plan. Woodbury/Syosset area residents have stood strong and tall against the mega-mall for years. Now it’s’ time for residents from throughout the town to join them.

The sale is the subject of a referendum on Tuesday, Aug. 20. I hope everyone, no matter where they may live, will get out and vote YES for the land sale. Let’s approve the deal while putting the mega-mall plan out of its misery.

Mark Avrutine

Plainview

 

Letter: Pick Up After Your Pet

Thursday, 25 July 2013 00:00

Many dog owners are completely unaware of the impact of not picking up after their pet. Some common misconceptions from pet owners are: It’s completely natural and leaving it on the ground to decompose is fine if it’s left where someone can’t step in it.

According to the EPA, pet waste is 57% more toxic than human waste, and in 1991 it was placed in the same health category as oil and toxic chemicals. The EPA also estimates that in two or three days, 100 dogs can produce enough bacteria to close a small bay with a 20 square mile watershed to swimming and fishing. Dog feces contain high concentrations of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), and pathogens (bacteria, viruses, worms and parasites) that can cause serious illness in humans and pets. Dog feces can take up to a year to break down in the environment. Some fecal bacteria can even become airborne. The deposit site can become toxic to both dogs and people. Some pathogens can survive for years; for instance, roundworms and Giardia survive up to four years, E. coli can live up to four months, and salmonella up to six months.

 

From Long Island Wins: July 18, 2013

Written by Maryann Sinclair Slutsky Thursday, 18 July 2013 00:00

A Troubling Alternative

I prefer thinking positive thoughts. But not everyone has the same mental habits. There are some folks who just love thinking through the absolute worst-case scenarios. What if the LIE shuts down and I can’t get home? What if Long Island beaches became infested with sharks and all are closed for the summer? What if the Mets never get their act together?

Those are all pretty crazy, right?

But now it’s worth taking a look at a possibility that seems just as crazy if it were to happen – that the House of Representatives doesn’t pass immigration reform, and our federal system stays broken.

 

Letter: A Work of Fiction?

Thursday, 11 July 2013 00:00

Earlier this month Comptroller George Maragos mislead the public during his announcement of the county’s 2012 year-end financial results. Publicly releasing the County’s year-end fiscal results is one of the primary responsibilities of the Comptroller and typically occurs in February or early March. Every year Maragos has been in office he has delayed the release – this year pushing it to June – in effect creating his own timeline. This raises serious doubts about the County’s financial condition and represents an abdication of responsibility by the Comptroller. It is my firm belief that Maragos’ announcement of the year-end financial results is a work of fiction.

It is the Comptroller’s job to issue honest, timely, and accurate financial reports rooted in reality, not to play the role of fiscal Houdini by fudging the numbers to hide a deficit. The rating agencies aren’t buying these misleading statements, and just this month Fitch downgraded Nassau County’s bond status given the poor state of the county’s fiscal health.

 

Hicksville Water District News

Wednesday, 03 July 2013 10:40

The Hicksville Water District Board of Commissioners Chairman Nicholas Brigandi reminds residents of the district’s commitment to monitoring the local water supply in Hicksville. The Hicksville Water District tests the water supply around the clock in order to provide residents with the highest quality water.

“We are obligated and committed to constantly providing our residents with the highest quality water supply at the lowest rates” said Board of Commissioners Chairman Brigandi. “The district proactively upholds a rigorous testing schedule that meets or exceeds state and federal requirements to ensure a clean, abundant water supply.”

 

Letter: Facts Over Opinions

Wednesday, 03 July 2013 10:39

I read with great interest, and then with dismay, the letter to the editor from my friend Norman Gersman, attacking long time Great Neck resident Howard Weitzman who is a former mayor of Great Neck Estates and former County Comptroller. It is important for readers to understand that Norman was one of George Maragos’ campaign operatives in 2009 and has held a series of County jobs ever since. Also, Norman refers so glowingly to the column by Mike Barry praising and defending Comptroller Maragos’ record … without indicating that Barry is a well-known and consistent supporter of Republican officials and candidates.

 

Letter: Response to Rep. Jack Martins’ Letter About Fair Elections

Wednesday, 03 July 2013 10:39

New York has a historic opportunity to reform election laws. The 2013 Fair Elections Act, which provides for greater transparency and strictly enforced campaign finance laws, recently passed the State Assembly by a vote of 88-50. In contrast to the wild calculations that Sen. Martins provided, a public campaign finance system could be had for the cost of only $2 per person per year, according to the nonpartisan Campaign Finance Institute; a candidate’s participation would be optional. I daresay that most New Yorkers would gladly pay a mere $2 (the cost of a cup of coffee) for fairer, more transparent elections.

 

Letter: A Real Shame: Princesses: Long Island

Thursday, 27 June 2013 00:00

I’m proud to represent an area of Long Island that has been the location for many famous movies and TV shows, including Citizen Kane, Annie Hall, and the hit television series Boardwalk Empire. It’s even the setting for The Great Gatsby. Shamefully, it’s also now the location for a show whose characters are disgraceful, misleading, and fuel anti-Semitic stereotypes: Princesses: Long Island.

Full disclosure: I kind of enjoy reality TV. Storage Wars and Pawn Stars are among my guilty pleasures. So the idea of watching a reality show taking place in my own backyard wasn’t so far-fetched. I knew little about the show before sitting down to watch the season premiere.

 

Letter: Back to Basics

Thursday, 27 June 2013 00:00

I agree with John Owens’ article, “School: Testing Mania Has Gone Too Far” [Anton Newspapers, June 21]. Continuous testing is turning off both students and teachers. Go back to basic goals: an informed citizenry with a moral compass and a skills oriented curriculum like BOCES offers. Then those who are truly academic will opt for college and those who aren’t will be our hairdressers, sales people, plumbers, electricians, etc.

Elaine Peters

 

 

Letter: Response to Rep. Jack Martins’ Letter About Fair Elections

Thursday, 27 June 2013 00:00

New York has a historic opportunity to reform election laws. The 2013 Fair Elections Act, which provides for greater transparency and strictly enforced campaign finance laws, recently passed the State Assembly by a vote of 88-50. In contrast to the wild calculations that Sen. Martins provided, a public campaign finance system could be had for the cost of only $2 per person per year, according to the nonpartisan Campaign Finance Institute; a candidate’s participation would be optional. I daresay that most New Yorkers would gladly pay a mere $2 (the cost of a cup of coffee) for fairer, more transparent elections.

According to a recent Mercury Public Strategy poll, more than three-quarters of likely voters agree that reforming New York’s campaign finance laws is key to cleaning up Albany, rooting out corruption and improving the work of state government. Public financing would increase the number and diversity of candidates for office, require more disclosure, and give low- and middle-income candidates the opportunity to run credible campaigns against well-heeled candidates.

 

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