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Herricks Touts Two 1,000-Point Scorers

Fellus, Ricchiuti look to take game to college level

Herricks High School’s basketball program is celebrating the accomplishments of two 1,000-point scorers, one boy and one girl, both seniors who own their school career scoring record. And both are convinced that the other one is the better player.

So who would win a 1-on-1 match between Andrew Fellus and Alison Ricchiuti?

“She would,” Fellus said.

“He would,’” Ricchiuti said.

One thing is certain. It would be a battle because these two players, who both began playing backyard basketball as youngsters and grew into varsity stars at Herricks, have a zest for the game and an ability to score baskets almost at will.

Their achievements are still sinking in on the two players, who still remember their first baskets all these points later.

“It was in the second quarter of a game in my freshman year,” Fellus said. “I had an open 3-pointer. I knocked it down. When that happens, you think to yourself, `Hey, I can do this.’ You’ve been playing all your life, since you were a little kid and then, one day, you get there.”

Ricchiuti’s first basket came in a scrimmage. “I was excited,” she said. “I didn’t expect to play or score and then I did. It was a great feeling.”

The 1,000-point plateau came later for both. “I got there first,” Ricchiuti said. Fellus followed and recalled his feelings on the accomplishment.

“It’s awesome,” he said. “It’s a dream come true. When I was a little kid, looking at older kids and thinking I want to be like them and then to get there, that’s special.”

Fellus punctuated his run to 1,000 points with a 49-point game against Calhoun. On the same night, Ricchiuti hit 34 against the same opponent.

The two Highlander stars have contrasting styles.

 Fellus is a point guard who likes to shoot 3-pointers. “I shoot a lot of them,” he said. “When you hit a big three, that’s the greatest feeling in the world.” He often draws the attention of more than one defender, allowing him to feed teammates for open shots. “I get great joy out of assists,” he said. “When they double team me, it allows me to set up teammates.”

 Ricchiuti drives to the basket more but appreciates the big three, as well.

Both have scholarship offers and plan to play college ball. Fellus plans to study business. Ricchiuti is looking for a major in physical or occupational therapy. Each maintains a 3.3 academic average and both have learned to budget their time.

“Balancing school work and basketball helps me stay organized,” said Ricchiuti, who also plays soccer. “We all know that if you don’t do well in school, you don’t play. And we want to play.”

“You’re motivated,” Fellus said. “You want to do well at basketball and you want to do well in class. You want to go to a good college and play there. That’s the motivation.”

The next stop for each will be to take their game to the next level in college. But if they want to try a little intramural 1-on-1 beforehand, well, they’d better bring their game face to the court because they’ll be facing a record-breaking opponent.

News

Senator Jack Martins discussed education, business and drug use among other topics in a an exclusive interview with this newspaper and FiOS 1 News. He’s currently seeking re-election in November, being challenged by Democrat Adam Haber. Pointing to what he called “key legislation,” particularly the tax cap legislation passed in 2011 and prescription drug bill he helped shepherd to enactment, Martins feels New York State is on track to continue fiscal responsibility.

 

“In these last four years, we’ve had four balanced budgets, we’ve cut taxes working together, we have paid off debt, streamlined government, kept spending below 2 percent each one of those years,” Martins said.

Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice’s office confirmed it’s investigating allegations made towards a Long Island Little League coach, suggesting he kept $12,000 players raised for a trip to Cooperstown.

 

Parents were outraged and children heartbroken to find the team would not be going to Cooperstown this year. They say Merillon Sharks coach Vincent Carreca, of New Hyde Park, told kids they were ready to go a few days before the trip. Then parents, who called Dreams Park in Cooperstown to confirm meal plans, learned the Sharks were not registered for the event.

 

“This is a horrible thing that happened,” one parent said, who asked not to be identified.


Sports

Sewanhaka boys soccer coach Peter Burgess wasn’t sure how long his team’s playoff drought was when it was broken last season. 

 

“Somebody said it was 13 years,” said Burgess, whose entering his fourth year coaching varsity. “But I think it was five or six, I don’t know maybe longer.”

 

But one thing’s for certain, he wants to keep last year’s momentum going. 

 

The Indians, who started their season with a 3-0 loss at Hewlett, will aim for their second straight trip to the playoffs this year. 

The Sewanhaka Indians made their Nassau Conference II debut with a bang.  The Indians opened their season at home against the Calhoun Colts, unsure what to expect, as all they had ever seen of the Colts was one tape of a scrimmage. 

 

“It was nerve raking leading up to the game,” said Head Coach George Kasimatis. “We weren’t sure what to expect on offense or defense, you have to guess early on. “

 

But it didn’t take the Indians long to introduce themselves to the conference, as junior, Quarterback, Elijah Tracey broke a 75-yard run taking it the distance to put the Indians up early, which ended in a 27-7 rout of the Colts. 


Calendar

Town Zoning Meeting - September 17

Herricks Meeting - September 18

Bike Safety Day - September 21


Columns

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