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Stop In The Name Of Lies

What to watch for if you get pulled over

Police in Mineola had bullet points for law-abiding citizens to consider after an Elmont teen posed as a police officer on Feb. 25. Andrew Schreier, 19, was involved in a road-rage infused argument on Elmont Road where police said he pulled up next the victim’s car and said, “I’m a cop and I’ll give you tickets” and flashed a gold badge.

Authorities said Schreier pointed a 911 Colt .45 replica BB gun and yelled at the 29 and 47-year-old passengers. The victims called 911, followed Schreier into a dead end on Rockmart Street and led responding officers to him with the help of a neighbor, police said.

Inspector Kenneth Lack said that people should be aware of what to look for if pulled over by a police officer in plain clothes.  Lack suggested driving to a well-lit area at night, such as a gas station or place with a lot of people, and keep the engine running.

“If that officer is legitimate, ask them to get a marked car to come down and if he’s not willing to do that, call 911.”

It would have been tough for the victims to seek out if Schreier was the real deal. According to police, he was carrying a forged Department of Homeland Security photo identification card and two Federation of Postal Police photo IDs as well as police-grade handcuffs.

Lack said the badge Schreier used in the incident belonged to his father, a retired postal service police officer but who still works in law enforcement.

“They were forged by the defendant,” Lack stated. “Those particular identification cards are not that difficult to reproduce. I would certainly think the stuff he was carrying around that he had some interest in law enforcement.”

According to Third Precinct Commanding Officer Sean McCarthy in Williston Park, plain-clothes officers do at times “ride alone” but usually ride in pairs. A visible shield is also prominent from a real officer.

“There’s almost always at least two working together,” McCarthy said. “A car should have a combination or red, white and blue flashing lights.”

Lack called Schreier a “law enforcement buff” and urged anyone who may think they were unlawfully pulled over by Schreier, to contact the Fourth Squad.

“People should not be riding around with these items in their cars, particularly if they’re not in law enforcement,” Lack said.

Officers said they found a small glass bottle in his right shoe containing what police called “a substance believed to be MDMA,” a methamphetamine derivative. He also had a forged New Jersey Drivers License in his possession.

Schreier was charged with two counts of third-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance, three counts of second-degree forgery, first-degree criminal impersonation, two counts of second-degree menacing and fourth-degree possession of a dangerous weapon.