Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

Common Core Shakes Parents’ Confidence

Tools for parents listed on district’s website

More than 60 concerned parents of Island Trees children filled the auditorium at the January PTA meeting, which took place at Stokes Elementary School on Jan. 2. The meeting focused on the new Common Core learning initiatives that are being rolled out this year. Led by Dr. Penny Fisher, principal of J. Fred Spark Elementary School, and Robert Harrington, interim principal of Michael F. Stokes Elementary School, the meeting focused on the major differences that will appear on the New York State tests this spring. And the differences, both said, are major. 

“We are competing with other countries for the economic dollar,” Harrington said about the reasons why the U.S. is stepping up education standards, before adding that the curriculum has dropped down a grade – meaning that what children were once taught in fourth grade, they will be taught in third grade. “Full day kindergarten now allows for an enriched curriculum,” he explained. 

However, with the first round of the newest state tests being rolled out this spring, Harrington and Fisher discussed the instructional shifts for the Common Core and how parents could help prepare their children at home for the test. The largest shifts in curriculum are in the English and math sectors, where there is an increase in nonfiction literature as well as more practical applications in math. The duo showed the gathered group sample questions from the newest test and compared them to questions from an exam from five years ago. The result? A sharp increase in reading and problem-solving skills will be needed in order for children to excel on the exam – an issue that the school is addressing currently, Fisher said. 

“The more we expose our children to work like this, the faster their researching skills will grow,” she said. “But we have been proactive in getting [the changes] into the classroom and preparing the kids.”

The conversation got heated, however, when the fact that the district is having issues getting staff members to offer extra help and this year, extra help would only be offered to students nominated by their teachers. 

“The biggest concern among the parents is that their child won’t get the extra help that they need to get them prepared for this test,” said Kathi Sidewitz, a parent and PTA member. To resolve the issue, Dr. Fisher said she would see if there would be high school students available to help tutor the children privately after the parents requested such a service multiple times. 

Other challenges include the need for assistance materials at home or classes for parents to help prepare them to help the children when it comes to prepping for the exam. “Not all of our parents have an education and not all of our parents have English as their first language,” one parent pointed out. “How can we help them to help their children?” Although Harrington said that he did not have anything planned, such as parent workshops; he said that he has been putting all Common Core materials on the school website and it is available in several different languages. 

Another main concern, according to parents, is the fact that the new curriculum is very challenging for the students; students may begin to feel badly about their academic performance if they don’t do well on these exams. 

“This curriculum is de-motivating to these children,” said Karen Mossman, “It’s much more academic and much less fun. It’s a sad state of affairs that we need to be pushing more and more on these…babies,” she said. 

“Confidence is fragile at this stage,” added another concerned mother. “If I have a child who does fairly well in school and not so well on this exam, I’m just afraid that it will change the way they feel about themselves,” she added. 

Harrington explained that the tests would not be used as an indicator of how children perform overall, but as a way to preventatively identify children who will need to the extra help the next year. “Over-identification will happen at first because we have heard that the test is really hard and there is a lag,” he said. 


News

As the high school seniors depart on their own adventures, so too, do students finishing fifth and eighth grades, look to the road ahead. 

 

Last June, students in the Levittown Public School District’s six elementary and two middle schools celebrated a new chapter in their academic careers with a host of celebratory speeches and awards from exemplary students in the district. In celebration of Moving Up Day, the Levittown Tribune takes a look at some of the academic accomplishments from students “moving up” out of elementary and middle school. 

 

For more on Levittown’s Moving Up Day ceremonies, see page 28A.

Sebastian, a two year-old pit mix with chocolate and caramel fur, wags his tail and splashes inside of a kiddie pool outside of the Forgotten Friends of Long Island rescue center in Levittown. The energetic pup is looking for a home, just like the four other dogs housed at this location in the basement of the Animal Hospital at 4 East Village Green. 

 

“He’s good with other dogs and actually likes cats,” said Beth Marzo of Plainview, a dog coordinator at Forgotten Friends of Long Island. Sebastian was rescued from the Town of Hempstead Animal Shelter where he lived for one year. 


Sports

Runners and walkers from Levittown and all over Long Island and beyond are invited to join in the fun on one of the most unusual 5 Kilometer courses on Long Island at the Saturday, August 9th Lynn, Gartner, Dunne & Covello Sands Point Sprint.

 

The Run presents the Long Island running community with an opportunity to traverse a unique combination of paved paths and runner-friendly woodland trails at the Sands Point Preserve. 

 

The leading Nassau County law firm of Lynn, Gartner, Dunne & Covello has signed on to be the new lead sponsor of the event, with partner John Dunne and his wife planning on running the 5K distance. The Lynbrook Runner’s Stop will be back as the presenting sponsor. 

Four MacArthur High School senior varsity lacrosse players have recently signed National Letters of Intent to continue playing their sport on the collegiate level. Parents and faculty accompanied Mary Kate Butler, Alex Goodelman, Kelly McQuail and Samantha Santeramo as they signed an agreement to play lacrosse at Farmingdale State College, Hartwick College, Dowling College and Bryant University, respectively.

 

— Submitted by the Levittown Public School District


Calendar

Fire and Ice - July 18

Child Car Seat Safety Program - July 19

Face Painting Jam - July 22


Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com