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Covering All Bases: November 19, 2012

An Abuse Of Power

“Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.” Abraham Lincoln

This is one of my favorite quotes that I often repeat. During my experiences, I have met individuals who have gained power and used it to make a positive difference, help others, and make themselves true leaders. I have also encountered those who let the power go to their heads and used it in a bad manner. Therefore, I consider this statement from Lincoln to be truly sage advice that I often refer to, and with a movie about the 16th President now showing in movie theaters, it is also timely.

It is also timely because of the last word in that quotation – power. Over the past few weeks, having power – the electrical kind – has been one of the biggest issues on Long Island. Some businesses were fortunate enough to have electricity throughout the storm and these establishments were often packed in the days after the hurricane hit as those left in the dark searched for hot food, supplies, gas, a place to wash their clothing, and other basic needs that suddenly became difficult to meet. During that time, I saw examples of those who used their good fortune admirably as well as those who didn’t.

One gas station that I filled up at did not raise their prices extraordinarily due to the shortage. One night, even though this station was one of the only stations in the area to have gas, and also had a very long line of motorists waiting to fill up, the attendant thanked me for my business. Wow. It was an act of civility among the madness. A pizza place that I frequent often was very accommodating, even though there was a two-hour wait for a pie, as if they appreciated my steady patronage before and knew that it would be their regular customers who would support their business after the crisis had ended.

By contrast, another business that I went to was not so nice. I was treated with arrogance, and prices that I thought were exceedingly high.

I’m sure most of you have similar accounts. There were some who acted very responsibly in the aftermath of the storm and those who you feel abused the “power” that they were lucky enough to have. One common quote that I heard in the immediate days following the storm was, “I hope everyone remembers this after things get back to normal.” I heard that quipped about a gas station, as the speaker believed the prices were way too high. Well, I agree with this quote. I hope everyone remembers how they were treated. I hope everyone remembers those who were there for the community, and did not plunder and pillage. I hope customers continue to patronize these businesses, now that things are getting back to a semblance of normalcy. And I also hope consumers remember those who abused the power, were curt, and raised prices to unacceptable levels.

How people act when they have power, whether figurative or real, says much about their character. Now the power is returning to everyone else. It is our chance to use our “power” to hold others accountable for their actions.

Ron Scaglia is the Special Sections editor of Anton Newspapers.

News

Two hundred business students from high schools across Nassau County, including Massapequa High School, competed for scholarships and cash awards—more than $33,000 in all—from various sponsors at Nassau County’s annual Comptroller’s Entrepreneurial Challenge.

The events on Sept. 11, 2001 had a profound effect on nearly all in the tri-state area, but for first responders, the effects were overwhelming. Long-time Massapequa resident Michael Smith, a member of the New York Fire Department, experienced those effects firsthand.

“While I’ve always been a person that could appreciate life, after 9/11 I became so distraught,” he said. “I realized I need to do something I want to do — something I love to do.”

A 30-year veteran of the fire department, Smith retired in 2002. He and his wife of 33 years, Teresa, began to look for a place they could enjoy life. This mindset brought them to the East End of Long Island, where they often went for day trips. They settled down in a home in Orient Point in 2004; in a home that needed quite a bit of work. And when it was time to landscape the property, a new idea took root — a vineyard.


Sports

Massapequa athletes recently received honors from their coaches at Kellenberg Memorial High School.

Each season, the coaches of all of the Kellenberg teams choose one member of their team who stands out as an athlete that has worked hard to improve themselves in their chosen sport.

The Farmingdale State women’s lacrosse team won the first game of their Spring Break trip to North Carolina with a victory over Greensboro College. In wet and muddy conditions, the Rams (8-1) held an 8-5 lead at the half and took the eventual 13-10 win.

In the first half and tied 2-2, the Pride (7-5) pulled ahead 4-2 with two unassisted goals by junior attack Nadya Fedun. Farmingdale State answered with four straight scores for a 6-4 advantage, on goals by juniors Alyssa Handel, Nicole Marzocca and Massapequan Jackie Kennedy.

Sophomore attack Ashlynn Parks put Greensboro within a goal at the 7:03 mark, but the Rams scored two more to lead 8-5 at the halftime break.

Calendar

Free Wine Tasting

Friday, April 18

Boating Course

Saturday, April 26

Massapequa Memories

Tuesday, April 29



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com