Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867
Intended comprare kamagra senza ricetta company.
Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

‘Barktoberfest’ Coming To Pet Vet

Massapequa Pet Vet Animal Hospital will be holding its second annual “Barktoberfest” fundraiser on Sunday, Oct. 20 from noon to 5 p.m. at its new facility located at 5330 Merrick Rd., across from the Marjorie Post Park.

The event, according to Dr. Ned Horowitz, veterinarian and owner of Pet Vet, was created  to raise money for non profit groups. This year the organizations selected are “All About Spay and Neuter,” which helps people who can’t afford to spay and neuter their animals; “The Barking Barracks,” which finds home for pets whose owners are enlisted in the military to either find new homes for them or to provide temporary housing; and Long Island Wildlife and Animal Rescue, a wildlife and dog/cat rescue group providing medical care and rehabilitation.

LIWAR is run out of Pet Vet by Dr. Horowitz, who has been working with them for eight years.

“We provide medical attention to injured animals that good Samaritans, the police, or the bay constables or the shelters bring to our hospital,” he said. “We provide medical care to them and after that we have a rehabilitator get involved.”

Horowitz said 1,000 people attended the event last year and was very successful. There is no fee charged and the event is open to the public, but they are asking for donations to help these organizations. There will be a bouncy castle for kids, games, training demos, raffles, a DJ, food and pet adoptions. The public is invited to come and bring their pets and prizes will be awarded for both the Best Pet Costume and Best Trick Contest. They will also have “Ask the Vet” so people can ask questions about their pets.

“The public can help by donating money; we also need towels, which are used for the injured animals,” said Horowitz. “If you see an injured animal bring it in, don’t just leave it there. But be cautious about how you bring it in. I don’t want someone picking up an injured raccoon because that could be dangerous.”

Touring the facility on that day they had a baby squirrel, an injured bird and a seagull that needed surgery to remove a fishhook stuck in its throat. There was also Brie the cat, who suffered a broken jaw after being run over by a car. It was repaired by the doctor and she is doing very well now. Another kitten, Clark, had his pelvis smashed by a car but is now walking because of the care from Horowitz and his staff. They have had their share of swans, ducks, snakes, geese, rats, bats, raccoons; all needing help.

There are 15 licensed rehabilitators on staff, including Horowitz and the doctors who are trained to handle wildlife.

Horowitz emphasized that the reason his group does this event is to give back to the community, but there is a deeper reason as well.

“It’s more to raise money for animals in need that can’t speak for themselves, especially the wildlife where there is nobody to provide the care and funding for them, no groups that really go out of their way for the wildlife,” he said.

Providing for these animals is very costly and the care that Dr. Horowitz doles out is not reimbursed.

“We have a dog here that is 10 years old with rotten teeth, not neutered found in Brooklyn tied to a pole,” he said. “He was rescued and we are going to rebuild him and get him a home. He’s a great dog. Most places would put this animal down but we care about the animals.”

When asked why he does this, he smiled and looked at Brie, the newly-mended cat.

“Because we care about these animals,” he said. “If I don’t do it who will?”

Pet Vet is a full service veterinary center open seven days a week with extended hours and emergency availability. For more information about their services, call 516-797-VETS (8387) or visit www.mpetvet.vetsuite.com.