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Body And Brain Coming To Mineola

 Yoga facility opening on Hillside Avenue

Joyce Peprah was inspired, inclined to proceed with a vision of holistic healing through the power of yoga after suffering a leg injury. 

Rather than rely on prescription drugs to help with the pain, she pushed through the agony with spiritual discipline that originated in ancient India.

The idea sprung while working at her current job. She is a nurse at the Cornell Medical Center in New York City. 

However, the plan is coming to fruition in Mineola.

Peprah’s Body and Brain Holistic Center For Yoga will open at 365 Hillside Avenue after being approved by the Mineola Village Board on Wednesday, Jan. 9. The Uniondale resident has taught yoga since 2009.

Peprah holds a masters degree in midwifery and women’s health. Her work in the newborn intensive care unit in Manhattan keeps her humble and balanced.

“I had a problem with my right knee and left shoulder,” said Peprah. “I had the choice to go see my orthopedist first, but I chose to do yoga. Within three weeks my left shoulder was fine and my right knee is better. Then, I decided to train and teach people what I learned.”

With her background in physiology, Peprah thinks of applying yoga as an alternative healing solution. She plans to train up to eight people at a time during class sessions in the village, which could run five days a week.

The primary benefits of yoga include pulse rate decreases, cardiovascular efficiency increases, joint range of motion increases, and  eye-hand coordination aid, among other health related improvements. Peprah plans to apply all facets of the exercise routine.

“Everything that you do originates from your thoughts and emotions,” she said. “As a person with a medical background, I can understand that. We as people have feel-good hormones and then we have the hormones that create fight-or-flight [issues]. If people are constantly under stress, you are constantly being affected by fight-or-flight. Through yoga, we teach you to relax, to stretch and by the end of the day, you’ll feel better.”

Peprah plans to continue her position in Manhattan, but she feels that what you focus on will always grow. If the business takes off, she may hone her craft on the late 19th century callisthenic.

“If I want to help people, then I’ll have to [leave nursing],” said Peprah.

The approval process of the business was smooth, but saw slight opposition from neighboring residents. Jean Keeler, a 22-year Foch Boulevard homeowner was happy to see the center replace a mortgage broker,  but is concerned about parking issues.

“I think the enterprise you’re engaging in is a noble endeavor,” Keeler said. “Most of the parking [in the area] is on the street. Some of it is used on Foch Boulevard where we live. As a resident, I’m concerned about the flow of traffic coming to an already congested area.”

Keeler was also critical of the condition of the street, which she believes hasn’t been paved since she moved to Mineola. Peprah may encourage patrons to use a nearby municipal parking lot if no space is available during operating hours.

“We have a lot of U-turn situations happening, though having nothing to do with this business, but because it’s a through street to a main road, there’s a lot of traffic going through that area,” Keeler said.

The village currently has a road-repaving project in the works, according to village officials.

“I think this is a step above a dance studio, because some dance studios have kids in classes who need to be dropped off successively,” Trustee Paul Pereira said.

News

In a typical Long Island community packed with houses and backyards, there are a couple of acres of open land of community gardens where people are growing basil and dahlias and roses and cabbages—people like Terry Dunckey of Westbury and Peg Woerner of Great Neck, tending their small plots and helping to promote sustainable and organic practices.

East Meadow Farm, off Merrick Avenue, is owned by Nassau County and operated by Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) of Nassau County. Previously it was a family-owned farm that was purchased by the county through the Environment Bond Act Program, a $150 million program that called for, among several mandates, the preservation of 400 acres of open space. In 2009, CCE of Nassau was awarded the lease to the land and in January 2012 took possession of the property. East Meadow Farm is a place where we can get the best advice on how to make our gardens grow without harming the earth. Part of the CCE’s original proposal was the establishment of a farmer’s market and, now, the market is open two days a week, a place to purchase organic vegetables and flowers during the growing season.

Drivers—get ready to slow down. Nassau County is currently in the process of installing school zone speed cameras in an effort to enhance safety by encouraging drivers to travel with caution, as well as support law enforcement efforts to crack down on violators and prevent accidents caused by speeding.

Nassau County officials say they’re still investigating locations in the Mineola School District, while leaning towards installing cameras near the North Side or Willets Road schools in the East Williston School District. Cameras could begin operation in September.


Sports

Nobody wants to make excuses, but sometimes when the injury bug hits, it’s impossible to overcome. Mineola Mustangs football head coach Dan Guido, entering his 28th season at helm, knows the injuries were the cause for their first-round defeat at the hands of the West Hempstead Rams last November.

“There was too many injuries on the offensive line last season,” said Guido. “It was supposed to be our strength and it ended up being a weak link by the end of the season.”

Even with those injuries, the Mustangs went 4-4 during the regular season.

The BU15 Mineola Revolution were crowned champions of the Roar at the Shore Tournament 2014 in West Islip on Aug. 10. After dropping the opener 2-0 against North Valley Stream, Mineola bounced back to beat Freeport Premiere 2-1.

The Revolution’s offense exploded in the third game as they beat West Islip 7-0. Mineola’s final game pitted them against Quickstrike FC, which entered the contest without a loss and within a point of winning the tournament.


Calendar

Zoning Meeting

Thursday, Aug. 28

Mineola Village Meeting

Wednesday, Sept. 3

School Board Meeting

Thursday, Sept. 4



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
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