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Around the Town with Lou - October 9, 2009

Written by Lou Sanders Friday, 23 October 2009 00:00

Battle flags and the Stars and Bars of the Old Confederacy were stiff in the breeze at Memorial Park at a re-enaction of the Southern Armies’ encampment sponsored by the Mineola Library. A contingent of Confederate soldiers of the 57th Virginia Infantry Company D pitched their tents. They were led by Capt. Ray Picket whose great-great grandfather led the famous charge at Gettysburg. Newspapers were on display reporting that terrible battle of July 1 to 3 in 1863. More than 58,000 men fell those three terrible days in the worst battle in our history. In fact, Gettysburg was the bloodiest engagement ever fought in the Western Hemisphere. They had copies of the NY Times reporting the news as well as Harper’s Weekly, the Southern Weekly and the Daily Citizen. The latter newspaper was printed on the back of wallpaper due to the shortage of newsprint.

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Around the Town with Lou - October 23, 2009

Written by Lou Sanders Friday, 23 October 2009 00:00

Abraham Lincoln was born in Kentucky in 1809. In commemoration of his 200th anniversary our library will have Harold Holzer speak on “The Journey to Emancipation” on Nov. 13. Mr. Holzer is a leading authority on our 16th president and co-chairman of the Lincoln Bi-Centennial Commission. He has written many books about Lincoln; his latest is Lincoln President-elect and the Great Succession Winter 1860-1861.

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Around the Town with Lou - October 15, 2009

Written by Lou Sanders Friday, 16 October 2009 00:00

Battle flags and the Stars and Bars of the Old Confederacy were stiff in the breeze at Memorial Park at a re-enaction of the Southern Armies’ encampment sponsored by the Mineola Library. A contingent of Confederate soldiers of the 57th Virginia Infantry Company D pitched their tents. They were led by Capt. Ray Picket whose great-great grandfather led the famous charge at Gettysburg. Newspapers were on display reporting that terrible battle of July 1 to 3 in 1863. More than 58,000 men fell those three terrible days in the worst battle in our history. In fact, Gettysburg was the bloodiest engagement ever fought in the Western Hemisphere. They had copies of the NY Times reporting the news as well as Harper’s Weekly, the Southern Weekly and the Daily Citizen. The latter newspaper was printed on the back of wallpaper due to the shortage of newsprint.

 

Letter: Do Unto Others …

Friday, 16 October 2009 00:00

While usually I tend to remain hushed in silent opposition to opinion pieces with which I find disagreement, for whatever reason I felt compelled to respond to Robert McMillan’s Harsh Interrogations? in the Oct. 7, 2009 issue, which tackled the possibility of investigating the harsh interrogation tactics used by the CIA under the Bush administration, and instead proposes a different viewpoint for the reader’s consideration. From the onset it must be noted that “harsh interrogations” is simply a propaganda tool and euphemism for what can only be rationally recognized as torture. Water-boarding is not simply the simulation of drowning, it is drowning. While the act is described somewhat accurately by McMillan, the consequences are conveniently overlooked. The water poured over the person’s cloth-covered face not only radically obstructs breathing, but it initiates the panic of drowning as water enters the throat, lungs, and stomach. Oftentimes the suspect will lose consciousness only to awake, vomit and then be subjected to this technique repeatedly, again and again. It feels as though they are drowning, because they are, a little at a time. Under such tortured duress, the subject will say anything in order for the process to stop. This results in notoriously bad information and the intelligence community has known, for many years, that intelligence gathered under tortured coercion is consistently unreliable.

 

From the Desk of Assemblywoman Michelle Schimel - October 9, 2009

Friday, 09 October 2009 00:00

Preparing for the Unexpected: Be Informed

In the event that a disaster strikes, being prepared for the unexpected can make a stressful situation easier to handle for you and your family. It is important to have the proper tools and plans in place today to ensure the safety of you and your family tomorrow. To help you get ready, I am launching a three-part column series about emergency preparedness titled, “Preparing for the Unexpected.”

 

From the Desk of Assemblyman Thomas McKevitt - October 9, 2009

Friday, 09 October 2009 00:00

McKevitt Outraged Over Driver/Registration Fees

Assemblyman Tom McKevitt expressed outrage at the blatant money grab orchestrated by Governor David Paterson and his cohorts in the state Legislature. As part of the 2009-10 state budget, which McKevitt voted against, driver’s licenses and registration fees will increase dramatically.

Effective September 1, driver’s license and vehicle registration fees will increase 25 percent, which means an average class D driver’s license will go from $50 to $64.50 and registering an average weight vehicle will increase from $45 to $56. Adding insult to injury, effective April 1 of 2010 all registered vehicles will be required to get new license plates and renewed registrations forcing motorists to pay the new registration fee plus an increased $25 fee for the license plate, up from $15.

 

Letter: Urges Members Of Congress to Support Consumer Protection Legislation

Friday, 02 October 2009 00:00

Long Island Congressmembers Carolyn McCarthy and Gary Ackerman must stand up for consumers by supporting the Consumer Financial Protection Agency Act (“CFPA”) in the upcoming Financial Services Committee vote. This legislation (HR 3126) will establish a federal watchdog agency solely devoted to protecting consumers. Lack of regulation is among the top causes of the current financial crisis.

 

Letter: Traffic Light Needed At Third Street And Roslyn Road

Friday, 02 October 2009 00:00

On April 2, 2009 at approximately 7 p.m. at the intersection of Third Street and Roslyn Road in Mineola, I was struck by an unknown vehicle. I was walking across the street directly in front of the entrance to Birchwood Court Co-op. To date, the police have yet to apprehend a suspect in this case. I was treated at Winthrop-University Hospital as a result from said accident wherein I suffered injuries to my left arm and left leg requiring hours of surgery to both, as well as additional injuries. Later, I was discharged to Orzac Rehabilitation for physical therapy in Valley Stream where I had to undergo sub-acute therapy to my left arm and leg. Currently, I am still out of work awaiting my next surgery to my left elbow, which is scheduled for November 2, 2009. After, I will be home recovering wherein the physical therapy will become more intense.

 

Letter: Mineola Fire Department Says Thank You

Friday, 25 September 2009 00:00

(On Sept. 10, residents of Mineola passed a referendum on change in the Length of Service Awards Program (LOSAP) for the members of the Mineola Fire Department. The change now allows members to accumulate credit toward an award past the age of 60. The referendum passed by a 564 to 139 margin.)

The residents of the Village of Mineola had an opportunity to support their volunteer firefighters by casting their vote in favor of our Service Awards Program. At the conclusion of the vote, it was my distinct pleasure to announce the results to my membership with more than 80 percent of the votes cast favoring our department.

 

Letter: The Case for Tort Reform

Friday, 25 September 2009 00:00

In the raging healthcare debate this summer, both sides agree that reducing the cost of medical care for individual Americans is desirable. One important way to decrease costs is something called “tort reform.” A tort is defined as a social wrong. But in the healthcare field, consider a tort an act of medical malpractice where a patient is harmed by a medical error of a healthcare provider (a doctor, hospital, nurse, health aide, etc.). At the present time, a patient who is harmed can sue the healthcare provider for “pain and suffering,” and at trial, the patient could be awarded very large sums of money. The patient’s lawyer shares in that large reward. The award money comes from the malpractice insurance company. And the malpractice insurance company obtains its money from charging physicians tens of thousands of dollars a year (sometimes hundreds of thousands, depending on the medical specialty) in malpractice premiums. Doctors must purchase this insurance in order to practice medicine. Tort reform would place a cap on the amount of money that could be awarded in “pain and suffering” lawsuits. So you would limit these awards to, for example, $250,000, and would do away with massive multimillion dollar awards. This would bring down the price of malpractice insurance doctors pay. Huge monetary awards are a big motivator for many personal injury lawyers. These lawyers are strongly opposed to tort reform because it would limit patients to smaller awards and thus limit the lawyers to lower income.

 

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