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Taste Of Spring

TR Sanctuary friends visit

Planting Fields main greenhouse

The invitation to the Taste of Spring benefit for the Theodore Roosevelt Sanctuary and Audubon Center on Jan. 12 was very clear about the need. It was to help repair the damage caused to the sanctuary grounds by Hurricane Sandy. The main greenhouse at Planting Fields Arboretum State Historic Park was filled with guests chatting and enjoying the venue. More came than expected in spite of the uninviting weather that night with fog creeping along the ground on the dark roads.

Edward Mohlenhoff, event chair, explained there was a great deal of damage to the trees at the TRS as well as at Youngs Cemetery next door. “It’s taking a long time for the TRS to do the cleanup. It is because of the time involved in dealing with the insurance and with FEMA and other things that have to come together before the cleanup is complete. Our neighbors are a little impatient with us, but it is not an overnight fix. We will do everything we can to take care of it as soon as we can,” he explained. (See accompanying article.)

Ted Scherff, TRS&AC director, called the group to attention to make some remarks saying, “I knew you were having a good time because I couldn’t get your attention for some announcements.” He thanked all the TRS board members for their support saying, “It means an awful lot to me.” He added, “The day I was introduced to Elizabeth Roosevelt I knew I liked her.” She was one of the guests at the event.

Ms. Roosevelt has a special connection with the TRS&AC since in 1923, her grandparents, W. Emlen and Christine Roosevelt, established the first Audubon Songbird Sanctuary in the nation. The 12 acres were donated to Audubon in memory of their cousin, Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th president.

Sharff thanked Edward Mohlenhoff and called him the greatest advocate for the TR Sanctuary. He hosted the event. Mohlenhoff explained more of why the TRS needs their help because of Sandy and also invited the guests to the group’s 90th Anniversary Gala. The theme of the gala is the 1920s and will be held on May 4 at the Piping Rock Club. He encouraged guests to buy a table to sit with friends as they enjoy the evening.

Everyone was enjoying the pleasure of each other’s company. Thomas Ross, Sagamore Hill Historic National Park supervisor, reminded the guests that the site is still open during renovation. “The woods and the nature trail are open all seasons of the year,” he said. “They are pulling out all the windows for rehabilitation, and doing selective demolition.”

He explained that the public will be able to see some amazing photographs of the mansion on March 8 when a new exhibit opens at the Oyster Bay Historical Society’s Koenig Center. He said, “Artist/photographer Xiomara had unfettered access to Sagamore Hill after we had emptied the house. He is an National Park Service artist in residence at the Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut. We learned about him through his work there. He lives on Long Island, in Roslyn Heights. The Sagamore Hill photographic exhibit is going to be quite hot. He took photographs of features and parts of the rooms the public can’t see; and objects that were blocked by other items or were deep into the rooms. He is revealing them in an artistic way.”

Nearby, Louis Norris was chatting about the Great Horned Owl he had donated to the TRS. He inherited the museum specimen and then wondered what to do with it—where it would be appreciated—when he decided to donate it to the TRS. It was shot 50 years ago, he said. He said it is brought around to children’s fairs for them to see, “a genuine critter that they wouldn’t see unless they were in the mountains of New Hampshire.”

News

The installation of a cell phone antenna in the steeple of the Community Methodist Church of East Norwich has outraged parents, causing them to seek alternative preschool options for their children and resulting in the closing of the nursery school held at the church. The decision to close the school was announced last week, and the school shut its doors on the summer camp on Tuesday.

“We knew this might be coming, since the numbers were so low, but we didn’t know the summer camp would close so soon,” says Carolyn Wilson, who has been teaching at the Wesley United Method Church Nursery School for 35 years.

History will be made on Friday as Nassau Country Club opens its grounds for the U.S. Women’s Amateur Championship, playing host to the tournament which was last played on its greens 100 years ago. The club has been planning for the tournament for the past eight years or so, when the club’s president and mayor of Mill Neck, Peter Quick, says they first discussed having it return to Nassau for the 100 year anniversary. The tournament, conducted by the United States Golf Association (USGA), will have 156 women from all over the world competing for the Robert Cox Trophy and the title of national champion, including twin sisters Jennifer and Kristin Coleman, whose grandfather is a member of the club.

For the Coleman sisters, 21, of Rolling Hills Estates, CA, the tournament will almost be like a homecoming: they began playing golf at age 5, and have played Nassau Country Club a number of times over the years while visiting their grandfather, Daniel Coleman, who lives in Glen Cove.


Sports

The Long Island Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (LICADD) is holding its 34th Annual R. Brinkley Smithers Golf Invitational, a charity tournament, on Monday, Sept. 22, at The Creek and Piping Rock Clubs in Locust Valley.

This year, LICADD will have Kristin Thorne, Emmy Award Winning WABC-TV news reporter and personality joining them as Emcee and Auctioneer. The live auction boasts playing opportunities at some of the country’s top golf courses, along with dozens of silent auction and raffle prizes to please the most discriminating of tastes.

Everyone who enjoys running or swimming or both is invited to join in the fun for the 3rd annual “Summer’s Not Done Aqua Run” on Sunday, Sept. 14 at the Town of Oyster Bay’s TOBAY Beach in Massapequa.

UJA-Federation of New York and the Greater Long Island Running Club will be co-hosting the event, which will consist of an 800-Meter Swim in South Oyster Bay followed by a three-mile run through the TOBAY Beach Bird and Game Preserve.  You can compete as an individual or as a two-person relay team.  New this year – there is also a 3 Mile “Run Only.”


Calendar

July Band Concerts

Wednesday, July 30

Babysitting and First Aid Workshop

Thursday, July 31

Opera Night

Saturday, Aug. 2



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com