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Snouder’s For Sale Short Of $1 Million

Snouder’s Corner Drugstore is up for sale by Laffey Fine Homes. Patrick J. Valente, licensed associate broker said, “I just showed it yesterday morning to an interested buyer.” He said the asking price is $995,000, “just short of a million” and added, “everything’s negotiable today.”

Valente said, “It’s a great building, a town landmark and it does need work. It would be great for retail and maybe offices are a possibility. The heating plant is working and the taxes are a little under $40,000.”

He said, “It is the first thing you see when you come into town. It would be nice to have someone there.”

Valente said he has two potential buyers currently: “It depends on the price.”

The first floor is 4,000 square feet, and would be good for retail; the second floor is 3,000 square feet, which could be offices; there is a third floor big loft area. Located at 108 South St., Laffey dates the building at 1863. Snouder’s Corner Drugstore opened there in 1884.

It has housed two businesses on the West Main Street side. There is parking for two cars on the site.

The exterior has to be restored, Valente said, but everything has to remain the same, especially the paint color since it is a town landmark building. Town landmark law states that the area viewed by the residents from the streetscape must remain the same. Alterations out of view of passerbys are allowed with consideration.

All In The Family

Marie Genovese is the other Licensed Real Estate salesperson selling Snouder’s. Marie is married to Frank Genovese’s son, Frank. The Genovese’s son John worked in the store for some time, handling the medical equipment side of the business.

In 2011 after they closed the business, there was a hope of creating a Snouder’s Corner Drugstore Foundation to raise $3 million to preserve and restore the building but no momentum from the community was ever achieved. The building is still owned by the two partners Eugene King and Frank Genovese.

Retired pharmacist and father-in-law Frank Genovese said they still have their collection of antique bottles from the building. He is looking forward to the sale of the property. When Smiros & Smiros did their version of the restoration of the building, they suggested stripping off the façade on the South Street side to reveal the original porch. Genovese said, “What happens depends on who buys it. We are not doing what was originally planned, to raise enough money to preserve it.”

They had planned for retail on the first floor and offices upstairs. He said while the third floor ceiling is high enough for someone to stand up in, “You could use the third floor depending on how you develop the upstairs. It could be a mezzanine type thing, not as a complete floor, but you would need fire escapes.”

He said, “We were trying to raise the money and to get someone interested, trying to get the funding, it didn’t work out to well.”

Forty-Year Anniversary

Valente said, “Our company, Laffey Fine Homes, is celebrating our 40th anniversary on April 30, in Huntington with a Paramount event.” They are inviting 700 of their closest family and friends, with live music, and more information to become available as they get closer to the date.

Valente has been with Laffey from over a dozen years. “Education is the most important thing in real estate,” he said.

“We are on the Internet at Laffey.com and have close to 17 offices on the north shore. The father started the company in Bellrose and his sons took over. I work out of the office next to P.C. Richard’s on Route 25A, Northern Boulevard.”

Valente said one of those interested in seeing the building was a young couple. He said, “They appreciated the old world charm,” and he was able to share their interest since he had studied architecture himself.

In 2011, Isaac Kremer, Main Street Association executive director at the time, said, “There are substantial incentives for historic preservation including grants and tax credits that the building would qualify for - and the MSA has demonstrated through the Octagon Hotel and many other projects that it would be able to help get them.”

Another perk of being a landmark building is that the town is unusual in terms of Landmark Preservation laws, as it allows about a 15 percent reduction of the town tax on landmark property.

Longtime residents fondly remember the soda fountain that was at the store in the 1940s and ‘50s. They had hamburgers too. The young teens like to sit on the steps to the second floor, on South Street. It was a favorite hangout. When the fountain was removed, Frank Genovese stored the marble counter in his barn for some time.

News

If you missed the 6th annual champagne party at Coe Hall in Planting Fields, put it on your calendar for next year, because this is the party of the summer. A total of 175 guests attended, and many of them were in costume, a new addition to the popular champagne party. The always ebullient Henry Joyce, executive director of Planting Fields Foundation, greeted his guests with his date Daphne, a 3-month-old long haired Dachshund, who is a companion for his Great Dane, Lucy.

An expert’s tips on bringing the

best of your garden into your home

Right now, Oyster Bay is in bloom. From the well-tended gardens of Planting Fields to unmowed patches near the Shu Swamp preserve, flowers are not just beautify our community, they also are calling out to us to bring them inside our homes to add color and fragrance. You don’t hear them? Trust me, the flowers in your garden are even calling you by name.

But don’t just stuff a bouquet in a vase. Make them look as good and last as long as possible. To find out how to do that, as well as how to improve your backyard flora, I asked Scott Lucas, the greenhouse supervisor of Old Westbury Gardens for some advice. He invited to join him in his cutting garden.


Sports

Kevin Mercier, 39, of Oyster Bay, led a large contingent of local runners in the Lynne, Gartner, Dunne & Covello Sands Point Sprint 5 Kilometer Run, held on the grounds of Nassau County’s Sands Point Preserve on Saturday morning, Aug. 9. Mercier was the 18th finisher overall and third in the 35-39 age group with a time of  21 minutes, 7 seconds.

Other local runners winning awards at the Sands Point Preserve were Nicholas Cuddy of Oyster Bay, who earned first place honors in the Clydesdale Weight Division with a time of 25:53, Joanne Gallo of Oyster Bay, who  took home the first place award in the women’s 65-69 age group with a time of 28:11, and Anja Hermann of Oyster Bay, third place woman in the 20-24 age group, who finished in 28:47.

Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park in Oyster Bay will once again be the site of the Long Island’s premiere multisport event – the 27th annual Runner’s Edge - Town of Oyster Bay Triathlon on Saturday, Aug. 23, and the Runner’s Edge – Town of Oyster Bay Junior Triathlon for youngsters ages 8-13 on Sunday, Aug. 24.

The Saturday main event is a “sprint” triathlon, which consists of a half-mile swim in Oyster Bay harbor, a one loop 15 kilometer bike ride over hill and dale through beautiful Oyster Bay, Oyster Bay Cove and Laurel Hollow, and a 5 kilometer run through Mill Neck and Brookville, “up” to Planting Fields Arboretum and “down”to the finish at back at  Roosevelt  Park.


Calendar

Bayville Car Show

Friday, Aug. 22

Junior Triathlon

Sunday, Aug. 24

Historic Church Service And Tour

Sunday, Aug. 24



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com