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Snouder’s For Sale Short Of $1 Million

Snouder’s Corner Drugstore is up for sale by Laffey Fine Homes. Patrick J. Valente, licensed associate broker said, “I just showed it yesterday morning to an interested buyer.” He said the asking price is $995,000, “just short of a million” and added, “everything’s negotiable today.”

Valente said, “It’s a great building, a town landmark and it does need work. It would be great for retail and maybe offices are a possibility. The heating plant is working and the taxes are a little under $40,000.”

He said, “It is the first thing you see when you come into town. It would be nice to have someone there.”

Valente said he has two potential buyers currently: “It depends on the price.”

The first floor is 4,000 square feet, and would be good for retail; the second floor is 3,000 square feet, which could be offices; there is a third floor big loft area. Located at 108 South St., Laffey dates the building at 1863. Snouder’s Corner Drugstore opened there in 1884.

It has housed two businesses on the West Main Street side. There is parking for two cars on the site.

The exterior has to be restored, Valente said, but everything has to remain the same, especially the paint color since it is a town landmark building. Town landmark law states that the area viewed by the residents from the streetscape must remain the same. Alterations out of view of passerbys are allowed with consideration.

All In The Family

Marie Genovese is the other Licensed Real Estate salesperson selling Snouder’s. Marie is married to Frank Genovese’s son, Frank. The Genovese’s son John worked in the store for some time, handling the medical equipment side of the business.

In 2011 after they closed the business, there was a hope of creating a Snouder’s Corner Drugstore Foundation to raise $3 million to preserve and restore the building but no momentum from the community was ever achieved. The building is still owned by the two partners Eugene King and Frank Genovese.

Retired pharmacist and father-in-law Frank Genovese said they still have their collection of antique bottles from the building. He is looking forward to the sale of the property. When Smiros & Smiros did their version of the restoration of the building, they suggested stripping off the façade on the South Street side to reveal the original porch. Genovese said, “What happens depends on who buys it. We are not doing what was originally planned, to raise enough money to preserve it.”

They had planned for retail on the first floor and offices upstairs. He said while the third floor ceiling is high enough for someone to stand up in, “You could use the third floor depending on how you develop the upstairs. It could be a mezzanine type thing, not as a complete floor, but you would need fire escapes.”

He said, “We were trying to raise the money and to get someone interested, trying to get the funding, it didn’t work out to well.”

Forty-Year Anniversary

Valente said, “Our company, Laffey Fine Homes, is celebrating our 40th anniversary on April 30, in Huntington with a Paramount event.” They are inviting 700 of their closest family and friends, with live music, and more information to become available as they get closer to the date.

Valente has been with Laffey from over a dozen years. “Education is the most important thing in real estate,” he said.

“We are on the Internet at Laffey.com and have close to 17 offices on the north shore. The father started the company in Bellrose and his sons took over. I work out of the office next to P.C. Richard’s on Route 25A, Northern Boulevard.”

Valente said one of those interested in seeing the building was a young couple. He said, “They appreciated the old world charm,” and he was able to share their interest since he had studied architecture himself.

In 2011, Isaac Kremer, Main Street Association executive director at the time, said, “There are substantial incentives for historic preservation including grants and tax credits that the building would qualify for - and the MSA has demonstrated through the Octagon Hotel and many other projects that it would be able to help get them.”

Another perk of being a landmark building is that the town is unusual in terms of Landmark Preservation laws, as it allows about a 15 percent reduction of the town tax on landmark property.

Longtime residents fondly remember the soda fountain that was at the store in the 1940s and ‘50s. They had hamburgers too. The young teens like to sit on the steps to the second floor, on South Street. It was a favorite hangout. When the fountain was removed, Frank Genovese stored the marble counter in his barn for some time.

News

The installation of a cell phone antenna in the steeple of the Community Methodist Church of East Norwich has outraged parents, causing them to seek alternative preschool options for their children and resulting in the closing of the nursery school held at the church. The decision to close the school was announced last week, and the school shut its doors on the summer camp on Tuesday.

“We knew this might be coming, since the numbers were so low, but we didn’t know the summer camp would close so soon,” says Carolyn Wilson, who has been teaching at the Wesley United Method Church Nursery School for 35 years.

History will be made on Friday as Nassau Country Club opens its grounds for the U.S. Women’s Amateur Championship, playing host to the tournament which was last played on its greens 100 years ago. The club has been planning for the tournament for the past eight years or so, when the club’s president and mayor of Mill Neck, Peter Quick, says they first discussed having it return to Nassau for the 100 year anniversary. The tournament, conducted by the United States Golf Association (USGA), will have 156 women from all over the world competing for the Robert Cox Trophy and the title of national champion, including twin sisters Jennifer and Kristin Coleman, whose grandfather is a member of the club.

For the Coleman sisters, 21, of Rolling Hills Estates, CA, the tournament will almost be like a homecoming: they began playing golf at age 5, and have played Nassau Country Club a number of times over the years while visiting their grandfather, Daniel Coleman, who lives in Glen Cove.


Sports

The Long Island Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (LICADD) is holding its 34th Annual R. Brinkley Smithers Golf Invitational, a charity tournament, on Monday, Sept. 22, at The Creek and Piping Rock Clubs in Locust Valley.

This year, LICADD will have Kristin Thorne, Emmy Award Winning WABC-TV news reporter and personality joining them as Emcee and Auctioneer. The live auction boasts playing opportunities at some of the country’s top golf courses, along with dozens of silent auction and raffle prizes to please the most discriminating of tastes.

Everyone who enjoys running or swimming or both is invited to join in the fun for the 3rd annual “Summer’s Not Done Aqua Run” on Sunday, Sept. 14 at the Town of Oyster Bay’s TOBAY Beach in Massapequa.

UJA-Federation of New York and the Greater Long Island Running Club will be co-hosting the event, which will consist of an 800-Meter Swim in South Oyster Bay followed by a three-mile run through the TOBAY Beach Bird and Game Preserve.  You can compete as an individual or as a two-person relay team.  New this year – there is also a 3 Mile “Run Only.”


Calendar

July Band Concerts

Wednesday, July 30

Babysitting and First Aid Workshop

Thursday, July 31

Opera Night

Saturday, Aug. 2



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com