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Charity Fighters To Meet Opponents

The founders of the Long Island’s Fight for will host a Boxer Matchup Cocktail Reception on Monday, Oct. 7, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., at Carlyle at the Palace, in Plainview to announce the boxer matchups for this year’s 10th Main Event.

Kevin “Spider” Kelly, a Plainview resident and co-president and CCO of BigBuzz Marketing Group, is one of over 20 volunteer boxers from the business community who will gather with committee members, sponsors and fans to meet, network and learn who the boxers’ opponents will be in November.

Kelly and the other boxers, after months of preparation, fundraising and training, are anxious to know who they will face in the ring at the LIFFC main event scheduled for November 25 at the Hilton Long Island in Melville. There will be more than 10 bouts on the card that evening featuring business professionals who will go toe-to-toe on the canvas.

“The Boxer Matchup Reception is an event everyone is enthusiastic about attending,” said Kelly. “ As a volunteer boxer who has been training and preparing for the 10th Main Event in November, I am really anxious to find out my opponent’s name. There will be plenty of energy and excitement in the room as the matchups are announced.”

Proceeds from the LI Fight for Charity will be donated to The Long Island Community Chest, The Genesis School, and the National Foundation for Human Potential. LI Fight for Charity had donated $700,000 to Long Island charities since 2003; its fundraising goal set for 2013 is $200,000.  

Tickets are $10 per person for the Oct. 7 reception and includes food, beer, wine and soft drinks. For tickets and information visit www.lifightforcharity.org or call 877-240-7821.

News

One local playwright and his company — The Plainview Project — seem to be headed to the big leagues.

Claude Solnik of Plainview, the Plainview Project’s writer, is married with two children. While he has a master’s degree in dramatic writing from New York University, after graduating he ended up going into journalism, which currently remains his day job. But in his free time he indulged in his true passion, hammering out numerous play scripts until the day they he realized that he needed to stop sitting on these works he was creating and put them in the hands of actors that could give them life.

Even as they hoped the parties would reach a last-minute settlement, commuters across Long Island were scrambling last week to devise alternate plans for getting to work if Long Island Rail Road’s 5,400 workers go on strike July 20. And they were vocal in their anger with the Metropolitan Transit Authority. The strike, it seems, has roused commuter ire over a wide range of LIRR issues, from timeliness to cleanliness to costs.

“I’ll have to figure out a new way home from work,” said Marco Allicastro, a 20-year-old Queens resident waiting for a train home at the Bethpage station after a day’s work at the local King Kullen. “Long Island doesn’t really have a lot of options in terms of transportation. Maybe I should get a new job.”


Calendar

Sonny And Perley

Saturday, July 26

Women Artists You Should Know

Thursday, July 31

Adult Summer Reading Club

Through Aug. 7



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1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

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