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Letter: Boiling Mad At LIPA

The famous quotation from the movie Network—“I’m mad as hell and I’m not going to take it anymore,”—has now been transformed by three storms (Sandy, Athena, and a “storm” of criticism) into the question, “We’re boiling mad but are we going to take it forevermore?”

The boiling point of water is 212 degrees F., which leads me to a second question: What is the boiling point of more than a million New Yorkers who live on four pieces of land completely surrounded by water—namely, the islands of Long Island (including Brooklyn and Queens), Staten Island, Manhattan, and the City of Long Beach, when they have had no electricity for two weeks (although it seems like millennia)?

Sorry, Coney, but you’re not a true island due to your physical attachment to Brooklyn. Sorry, Bronx, but you’re “mainland” due to your literal attachment to Westchester. Sorry, Rockaways, but you’re only a peninsula, since you’re not completely surrounded by water due to your geographical connection to Nassau County.

I’m hopeful that the answer to the first question is that we’re not going to take it anymore; and I base this optimism partially on Governor Cuomo’s threat that he’s going to hold LIPA accountable for their proven inadequacy in responding to both Irene and Sandy.

As to what our exact boiling mad point is, I’d say it was hour number 212 without a call-back from LIPA as to an estimated date of restoration of power, since their website promises just such a call-back within 24-36 hours (not days or weeks) after a customer first reports their loss of electricity to them.

Note: I did finally get my power back after 287 hours, and 88 hours after that, I received a call from LIPA informing me that my power was back on.

Richard Siegelman

News

The wife of a Plainview man traveled all the way from Uganda to Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola to give birth the way she wished.

Chanda Ginsberg, whose Plainview native husband works for the United Nations and is currently posted in Uganda, was determined to have a VBAC (vaginal birth after cesarean). And when the time came, she and her husband chose Winthrop. While researching labor and delivery options, the couple was uncomfortable with the medical providers in Uganda and regional hospitals in East Africa. Her husband’s family lives in Melville with connections to Winthrop; his mother is a nurse practitioner who has worked with Winthrop, and his brother’s children were born at the Hospital as well. She also had her first child there three years ago, when they were back in the U.S. between posts.

Evel Knievel twitched his nose, wiggled his tattooed ear and winked at the Palamino bunny. Too Hot to Trot flipped over and was judged according to the American Rabbit Breeders Standard of Perfection.

The haybarn in the Old Bethpage Village Restoration recently played host to 40 exhibitors with their assortment of bunnies ranging from Dutch Satins, Angoras, English Lop, and the Lionshead at the annual Spring Long Island Rabbit Show put on by the Long Island Rabbit Breeders Association. After viewing these animals, one quickly realizes that not all rabbits are white with pink noses.


Calendar

Library Golden Anniversary

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LOL Comedy Night

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