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Over 60 ... And Getting Younger: January 18, 2013

A Writer’s Dilemma

The difficulty in which many writers find themselves is, should they pass up a good, solid interesting story or should they “rat out” some friend or acquaintance?

Joan Didion says, “A great memoirist, even one moved primarily by love and devotion, must possess a certain amount of ruthlessness.” The question to the author is, “Should I put down the truth about the person in my story or should I sugar-coat perhaps the lying and devious aspects with falsehoods and fiction?” That is the moral question!

Phillip Roth, the prolific and great American author, once made this observation about writing: “If a writer is sitting at your dinner table, be wary of anything you say or disclose about anyone or anything. Everything is grist for the writer’s mill.” All is fair in love, war and interesting disclosures.

 A writer spends much time staring at the blank, white page in front of him/her seeking out an essential truth to type for a article or story. Should he/she submerge that juicy tidbit and keep searching for a new subject? Probably not.

Be careful and never reveal more than you intended to, if Cindy Adams, Joan Rivers or Leo Tolstoy is sitting at your dinner table. A good story is hard to find.

I have been in writers’ group classes where the author has demanded that everyone pass the written story back to the author for concern or fear that a bold secret should get out. Even changing names and slightly changing situations does not baffle the people who know the basics of the story.

It is the author’s duty to get the story out and the informant’s duty to contain the tale. It is a situation that will have many of us on the horns of the proverbial dilemma.

News

Kids love amusement parks, and they especially love one aspect of these fanciful places above all others — the twists, turns and death-defying loops of the mighty roller coaster. Given the chance, it’s likely that almost any child would love the chance to actually build one of their own.

Susan Sears of Port Jefferson runs an ongoing series of science classes aimed at stimulating the growing minds of children. Recently, she was holding one of them at the Plainview-Old Bethpage Public Library on Roller Coaster design, which she described as “a physics lesson disguised as fun.”

School zone speed cameras are beginning to gear up in Plainview-Old Bethpage, and though the robot law enforcement tools are not yet fully operational, drivers are beginning to get road weary at the prospect of a surveillance state.

While officials at the Nassau County Traffic Safety board said that only five cameras have been activated, drivers are spotting far more on daily drives through the neighborhood. Michael Dulphin, a Plainview resident who makes a daily commute to a local college, said he has seen school zone speed cameras pop up near Parkway Elementary School as well as Our Lady of Mercy school on South Oyster Bay Road.


Calendar

Joel Zelnik And Move

Saturday, Aug. 23

Beyond Bereavement

Monday, Aug. 25

Reminiscing With Veterans

Tuesday, Aug. 26



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com