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Which: Park Or Bank?

Residents of Glen Head and Glenwood Landing have the job of deciding the fate of an abandoned corner lot in Glen Head, and must choose between creating a green space and giving the okay for a new office building to be built.

“Either choice would be a win-win,” said George Pombar. president of the Glen Head/Glenwood Landing Civic Council.

Pombar hosted a meeting on March 13 at the North Shore Middle School, where residents were able to give input. The Civic Council invited Hal Mayer, environmental consultant to Supervisor John Venditto and John Elsworth and Phil Schade, both also from the Town of Oyster Bay, to join in the discussion.

According to Pombar, there are two options currently on the table: allow The Town of Oyster Bay to build a park on the site, located at the corner of Glen Head Road and Glen Cove Ave. where the former Sunoco station space has been abandoned for the past four years, or sell the property to the First National Bank of Long Island. 

Three years ago a contract was signed between Sunoco and The Town of Oyster Bay for the purchase of the property to build a park. The contract included an agreement from Sunoco to do a complete environmental cleanup; when the property was not cleaned up in a timely manner, the contract was voided. 

“Since then Sunoco has completed the environmental cleanup on the property, but it is still a total eyesore,” said Pombar. 

At the time, it was estimated it would cost the town $700,000 to build the park. At present, Sunoco pays $40,000 a year on the property. If it becomes a park, the taxes would be spread out among all the residents in the TOB, and it will be the town’s responsibility to maintain the park. However, if the bank was to build on the property, taxes are expected to be $90,000.

If the community chooses the bank, the proposed two-story building would not be erected until 2016 and the property would not be purchased for resale. The bank would, according to Pombar, clean up the property immediately, take down the existing building, and plant grass and shrubs around the property.

One resident raised concern about building a park in an urban setting. “We have no plan, we don’t know exactly how it would be used. There is no parking, it can’t be built for athletics, and it’s no good for a children’s park. The community can’t go around losing tax revenue. We have to look beyond. We’re already losing with LIPA.”

Another resident said he has grandchildren and it would be a great place to take them if the property was a park.

“If the community wants the park, the town will build it,” said Mayer. “But the town does not want to push something on the community.

A survey form was handed out to residents at the meeting; those interested in offering input can contact the Civic Council.

“If we do not decide, the property owner can sell the property to any bidder with little input from our community,” said Pombar.

News

One local playwright and his company — The Plainview Project — seem to be headed to the big leagues.

Claude Solnik of Plainview, the Plainview Project’s writer, is married with two children. While he has a master’s degree in dramatic writing from New York University, after graduating he ended up going into journalism, which currently remains his day job. But in his free time he indulged in his true passion, hammering out numerous play scripts until the day they he realized that he needed to stop sitting on these works he was creating and put them in the hands of actors that could give them life.

Even as they hoped the parties would reach a last-minute settlement, commuters across Long Island were scrambling last week to devise alternate plans for getting to work if Long Island Rail Road’s 5,400 workers go on strike July 20. And they were vocal in their anger with the Metropolitan Transit Authority. The strike, it seems, has roused commuter ire over a wide range of LIRR issues, from timeliness to cleanliness to costs.

“I’ll have to figure out a new way home from work,” said Marco Allicastro, a 20-year-old Queens resident waiting for a train home at the Bethpage station after a day’s work at the local King Kullen. “Long Island doesn’t really have a lot of options in terms of transportation. Maybe I should get a new job.”


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Sonny And Perley

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Women Artists You Should Know

Thursday, July 31

Adult Summer Reading Club

Through Aug. 7



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