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Letter: ‘Raise The Age’ Outrage

Your “Raise The Age” story pointed  out that  74.4 percent of crimes that 16-and-17-year-olds are arrested for are only “minor” misdemeanors. Of course, that means that 25.6 percent are felonies, including burglaries, robberies, muggings, assaults, molestations, rapes, torture and murders. Yet District Attorney Kathleen Rice is against arresting, prosecuting and punishing 16- and 17-year-olds as adults for these horrible crimes “Regardless of the offense.”  Similarly, Assemblyman Charles Lavine feels that “children should be treated as children regardless of the crime” they chose to commit.

However, I consider the crime committed (and its victim) much more important than the age of the perpetrator. Presumably, Rice and Lavine would both object to treating the following “youths” as adults: The two 16-year-olds who recently beat an 88-year-old World War ll hero to death; the trio of 15-, 16-, and 17-year-olds who recently shot a visiting Australian baseball player to death because they were “bored;” and the 8-year-old who recently shot his 90-year-old babysitter to death. These were not the acts of “innocent children.”

Assemblyman Lavine said, “the treatment youths receive in prison can impact them for the rest of their lives.” Angelo Pinto expressed concern that the “trauma of incarceration damages these children emotionally.” Well, pardon me for asking about the impact, emotions, and trauma of their victims and the victims’ many loved ones. They are the people who get almost 100 percent of my sympathy; with the rest of it going to innocent future victims if these human “monsters” are not incarcerated as adults. Lavine said that 16 and 17 year-old criminals should be given an opportunity to rehabilitate, but what if only 10 percent of those released re-offend? What gives our justice system the right to, in effect,  “sacrifice” their future victims?

Richard Siegelman

News

The National Conference of CPA Practitioners (NCCPAP) is pleased to announce that on Nov. 1, two members of Plainview’s professional community will begin their term as officers serving on NCCPAP’s National and Nassau/Suffolk Boards.

At a the recent Annual Installation of Officers and Directors Dinner, which took place at the Crest Hollow Country Club in Woodbury, Donald Ingram, CPA and Stephen H. Sternlieb, CPA were officially installed at their new positions. Ingram was installed as a vice president for NCCPAP’s National Board of Directors, and Sternlieb was installed as a director for NCCPAP’s Nassau/Suffolk Chapter. Both CPAs run practices in Plainview.

Founded in 1995 by owner Bruce Grossman, the Cultural Arts Playhouse of Plainview is a year round, regional, off-off Broadway-style theater that has produced over 500 productions including educational and touring shows. It is also located in Roslyn Heights and Wantagh.

Named as one of Long Island’s Best Live Theaters, the theater serves more than 20,000 people each year with its professional adult productions, children’s theater performances, and theater education classes for ages 7-18. Artistic Director Tony Frangipane took time out of his busy schedule to talk theater.


Calendar

Movie: The Fault in Our Stars

Wednesday, October 29

Free Flu-Vaccines

Thursday, October 30

Family History Workshop

Sunday, November 2



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1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
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