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Letter: ‘Raise The Age’ Outrage

Your “Raise The Age” story pointed  out that  74.4 percent of crimes that 16-and-17-year-olds are arrested for are only “minor” misdemeanors. Of course, that means that 25.6 percent are felonies, including burglaries, robberies, muggings, assaults, molestations, rapes, torture and murders. Yet District Attorney Kathleen Rice is against arresting, prosecuting and punishing 16- and 17-year-olds as adults for these horrible crimes “Regardless of the offense.”  Similarly, Assemblyman Charles Lavine feels that “children should be treated as children regardless of the crime” they chose to commit.

However, I consider the crime committed (and its victim) much more important than the age of the perpetrator. Presumably, Rice and Lavine would both object to treating the following “youths” as adults: The two 16-year-olds who recently beat an 88-year-old World War ll hero to death; the trio of 15-, 16-, and 17-year-olds who recently shot a visiting Australian baseball player to death because they were “bored;” and the 8-year-old who recently shot his 90-year-old babysitter to death. These were not the acts of “innocent children.”

Assemblyman Lavine said, “the treatment youths receive in prison can impact them for the rest of their lives.” Angelo Pinto expressed concern that the “trauma of incarceration damages these children emotionally.” Well, pardon me for asking about the impact, emotions, and trauma of their victims and the victims’ many loved ones. They are the people who get almost 100 percent of my sympathy; with the rest of it going to innocent future victims if these human “monsters” are not incarcerated as adults. Lavine said that 16 and 17 year-old criminals should be given an opportunity to rehabilitate, but what if only 10 percent of those released re-offend? What gives our justice system the right to, in effect,  “sacrifice” their future victims?

Richard Siegelman

News

After surviving the “Cold Blooded” episode last week, the eight remaining contestants on Ink Master faced off in a “Flash Challenge” testing their ability to use finesse. The tougher the situation, the more finesse an artist needs to create a masterpiece, and this week was no exception.

Artists were given five hours to tattoo amputees. The residual limb left behind after an amputation can be badly traumatized, unusually shaped and scarred. The artists were challenged to create a phenomenal tattoo on the residual limb to make these amputees love the part of their body they are missing. Although all of the contestants created beautiful designs, Bethpage’s Erik Siuda’s incorporation of the scar tissue and pre-existing tattoo into his design showed the most finesse.

Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano recently announced that the annual “1863 Thanksgiving Holiday Celebration” at Old Bethpage Village Restoration will be held on Saturday, Nov. 22 and Sunday, Nov. 23 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Visitors to Old Bethpage Village, the re-created mid-19th Century village, will be able to enjoy the sights and aromas of an old-fashioned Thanksgiving including decorated pumpkin pies baked in a beehive oven and turkey roasted over an open fire. In addition, each afternoon, traditional fiddle music will be played, and children’s stories will be read several times each day.


Calendar

Concert Performance

Friday, November 21

Craft Barn Open House

Saturday, November 22

8th Annual POB Interfaith Thanksgiving Service

Tuesday, November 25



Columns

1959: The Year The Music Stopped Playing
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com

The Eccentric Heiress Of ‘Empty Mansions’
Written by Mike Barry, MFBarry@optonline.net

Yellow Margarine And A Pitch For The Ages
Written by Michael A. Miller, mmillercolumn@gmail.com