Anton Community Newspapers  •  132 East 2nd Street  •  Mineola, NY 11501  •  Phone: 516-747-8282  •  FAX: 516-742-5867

Letter: Preaching To The Choir

Thursday, 20 March 2014 09:49

Your “Patience Is A Virtue” editorial was a good one: a good “lesson," plus good advice. Unfortunately, it was probably “preaching to the choir”, because those of us patient, considerate reader-drivers will just continue practicing our responsible, careful driving habits; while the  impatient, reckless fools like the one you describe—who arrogantly think that THEIR time is more important than anyone else’s safety—are likely to continue their public-menace  bad  driving  habits.  

 

Letter: Why We Are Opting-Out

Thursday, 20 March 2014 09:48

A few weeks from now, New York’s public school children in grades 3-8 will spend six days taking the poorly designed, expensive New York State Assessments. The overreliance on these tests has pushed school districts to abandon successful curriculum models and confine themselves instead to the limited, unproven and expensive Common Core standards.  

 

Letter: Do Your Homework

Thursday, 13 March 2014 10:39

I read the attack on John Owens’ articles on Common Core by Stanley Ronell with amazement. How could one person be so misinformed about the topic of Common Core curriculum? Mr. Owens was a teacher, and his views were right on target. The curriculum and the roll-out have been a disaster. I suggest he read an excellent expose, Reign of Error, by Diane Ravitch, and Mr. Owens’ book, Confessions of a Bad Teacher, before he writes further letters.

 

Letter: Petition To Protect Your Child’s Privacy

Thursday, 13 March 2014 10:42

I know we are all busy, but I am asking you to read the following email and help our students in NY State.

By now I am certain you have all heard of Common Core. Though the intent may have been good, the resulting standards and implementation have been a complete debacle.

 

Letter: Of Seagulls and Teachers

Thursday, 13 March 2014 10:41

Regarding John Owens’ mention of the seagull being the state bird of Utah, here is the backstory:

When the Mormons first settled in Utah, they had a plague in 1848 of crickets, probably kaydids, or an infestation of some crop-eating insects, and low and behold, a swarm of seagulls came to their rescue. A miracle! Thus, the seagull is their bird.

See what comes of having teachers read your paper?

Jean Fontana

 

Letter: A Vote For ‘Country Pointe’

Thursday, 27 February 2014 11:27

We really want this new development, Country Pointe in Plainview, to come to pass.

When a town stops growing it shrinks and fades away. We are very active participants in the benefit of the community, and have invested too much time and energy in Plainview-Old Bethpage for this to happen.

 

Letter: Concerns with Farmedge

Thursday, 27 February 2014 11:34

I have lived in the Island Trees community for the past 41 years. When I was raising my children I was very active in both the Island Trees School community and many organizations that make up this community.

I was in attendance at the Feb. 10, meeting where the Island Trees School District presented their proposals for the Island Trees Farmedge property. I left that meeting with many concerns. One of my biggest concerns, was how this matter is being approached by both the school district and the Island Trees Library.

 

Letter: The Law Of Distraction

Thursday, 27 February 2014 11:28

Anton columnist Michael Miller was absolutely right to say, about the legal requirement that Smithtown Supervisor Patrick Vecchio follow up his publicly-pledged oral oath of office with a signed, written oath, “What a stupid law.” However, he called it an example of “the worst kind of law, the kind that is selectively enforced.” As bad as I agree it is, I believe there are many more equally bad — and worse — laws. Such as laws written (sometimes purposely?) with loopholes so big you could drive a truck through them; laws that are almost never enforced; laws “enforced” with pathetic slaps on the wrist, probations, conditional discharges, suspended sentences, concurrent sentences, community service, token fines viewed as a cost-of-doing-business and other “punishments” that fail to have the most desired effect of any “prohibitive” law: a deterrent effect. Therefore, I hope every Anton newspaper will invite its readers to submit their nominees for bad laws that themselves need the “death penalty.”

Richard Siegelman

 

Letter: Immigrants, Then And Now

Thursday, 20 February 2014 12:43

I found Maryann Sinclair Slutsky’s article on Michael Dowling (“An Immigrant Who Hasn’t Forgotten”) very interesting.

My parents also immigrated from Ireland, with an 18-month-old daughter, after waiting two years for permission to come. My mother was nine months pregnant with me at that time, but decided to come anyway.

This was in 1929, and they were here two weeks when I was born. So, you talk about struggle, no job, and then came the start of the Depression.

 

Letter: What’s The Pointe?

Friday, 14 February 2014 10:09

My wife and I are 80-year (!) residents of Plainview (full disclosure: that’s 40 for me, plus 40 for her); and we tried to attend the eight-hour Town of Oyster Bay hearing about the proposed Country Pointe Plainview development. That’s “tried” because there was so much traffic trying to get into the Matlin Middle School parking lot that we were turned away.  

But that’s the kind of thing that worries us about the after-effects if this development is built — because “If you build it, they will come.” We’re afraid that the addition of 890 families (along with their 1,000 to 2,000 cars) will produce similar traffic problems for our roads, and already-overcrowded parking lots in front of the Morton Village, Fairway, and Town Bagel shopping centers, plus the Plainview-Old Bethpage Public Library. The builder’s president, Michael Dubb, has acknowledged the inevitable traffic increase but has assured the Town that his Beechwood Organization would pay for “mitigation measures.”

 

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