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Neighbor's Delightful 'Depression'

Albertson resident Rosemary Trietsch is rounding up her most intricate Depression glass antiques collection since 1988 for the upcoming Big Apple Depression Glass Club’s Annual Glass and Pottery Show and Sale to be held on Sunday, Nov. 24 at the Shelter Rock Library, 155 Searingtown Rd. 

 

Trietsch, who is vice president of the club, first became fascinated with the beauty of glass back in 1932 when her father brought her grandmother an Iris and Herringbone tumbler set crafted by the Jeannette Glass Company. Her collecting days began when her husband found the identical set that she had admired for decades. Ever since, she has been adding new glass pieces to her ever-growing collection that she takes pride in. 

 

“The most fun part of collecting glass for me is when I come home with a new piece that I just bought, and then look for it in a book,” she said. “It’s like discovering a treasure all over again – once when you dig it up, and then again when you figure out what it is that you actually have found.” 

 

The collector is particularly fond of Depression glass which is glass that was made from 1925 to 1940 in the US.  She finds this type of glass special because of its unique tinted coloration and purpose.  She explained, “The thing about collecting Depression glass is that it is actually meant to be used. It’s not like other collectibles that you buy and just look at.”

 

However, her collection doesn’t only consist of this type of glass. 

 

“Once you start collecting anything, you find yourself moving from the common to the harder to find pieces,” Trietsch continued. “I collect Depression glass patterns like Iris and Herringbone, Cameo, and Manhattan, but I really love to collect Consolidated Glass Company pieces that was produced in the US from 1925 to 1929. These pieces are hand done and really lovely.”

 

The Big Apple Depression Glass Club became Trietsch’s outlet for sharing about her finds when her collection grew. The club formed in the 1970s when collectors discovered they all collected the same types of glass. The club which meets every month at the Shelter Rock Public Library is the last Depression Glass Club left on Long Island, and Trietsch and other club members hope to keep this hobby alive by delivering their annual show.

 

She is especially excited about the club’s upcoming show and sale that attracts collectors from all over the tri-state area. Dealers will bring a wide range of glassware and pottery produced from the 1920s through 1960s that will be available to purchase. This includes vintage lighting, Depression era tableware, kitchen glass, Fire King Glass, and elegant glassware. All items offered for sale were made in the United States and are authentic.

 

“Many of the people who come to the show are trying to replace a piece they grew up using,” she concluded. “Collectors come looking for the bowl that they remember their grandma or mom using on special occasions. Many people also have completely forgotten about this type of glass until they walk through the show. This is my favorite part of being a Depression glass dealer. I love helping people find and replace things they thought were gone forever. I know that what I sell will go on to create new family traditions, and for me, that is priceless.”

 

The Nov. 24 Big Apple Depression Glass Club’s Annual Glass and Pottery Show and Sale will, as noted take place at 155 Searingtown Rd. in Albertson. 

 

The show will run from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and admission is $5 per person. For more information, call 516-476-0155.